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Acta Neuropathologica

, Volume 136, Issue 6, pp 975–978 | Cite as

Chordoid meningiomas can be sub-stratified into prognostically distinct DNA methylation classes and are enriched for heterozygous deletions of chromosomal arm 2p

  • Philipp Sievers
  • Damian Stichel
  • Thomas Hielscher
  • Daniel Schrimpf
  • Annekathrin Reinhardt
  • Annika K. Wefers
  • David Reuss
  • David T. W. Jones
  • Melanie Bewerunge-Hudler
  • Christian Hartmann
  • Peter Baumgarten
  • Hans-Georg Wirsching
  • Bjarne Winther-Kristensen
  • Benjamin Brokinkel
  • Ralf Ketter
  • Miguel Angel Idoate Gastearena
  • Katrin Lamszus
  • Marcel Seiz-Rosenhagen
  • Christian Mawrin
  • Patrick N. Harter
  • Jörg Felsberg
  • Daniel Hänggi
  • Christel Herold-Mende
  • Anna Sophie Berghoff
  • Michael Weller
  • Stefan M. Pfister
  • Wolfgang Wick
  • Guido Reifenberger
  • Matthias Preusser
  • Andreas von Deimling
  • Felix Sahm
Correspondence

Chordoid meningioma represents a rare meningioma variant. It is histologically defined by the presence of trabeculae of eosinophilic and vacuolated epithelioid cells within a mucin-rich stroma [7]. The term chordoid meningioma was first used by Kepes et al. in 1988 [5], who published a series of seven cases. In a subsequent larger series of 42 cases, a considerable risk of recurrence even after total resection was identified [4]. Based on these findings, chordoid meningiomas are per definition graded as WHO grade II [7].

For several variants of meningioma, associations with distinct genetic events have been identified. Examples are KLF4/TRAF7 mutations in secretory meningioma, enrichment for AKT1 mutations in meningothelial meningioma, SMARCE1 mutations in clear cell meningioma, and BAP1 mutation or deletion in rhabdoid meningioma [2, 3, 9, 11, 12]. So far, no distinct mutation has been identified for chordoid meningioma. Also, no unique DNA methylation pattern has been found for...

Notes

Acknowledgements

This work was supported by the Else Kröner-Fresenius Stiftung (2015_A60 and 2107_EKES.24) and the German Cancer Aid (110983, 111670 and 70112956). We thank Laura Dörner and Hai Yen Nguyen for skillful technical assistance.

Supplementary material

401_2018_1924_MOESM1_ESM.docx (125 kb)
Supplementary material 1 (DOCX 125 kb)

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Philipp Sievers
    • 1
    • 2
  • Damian Stichel
    • 1
    • 2
  • Thomas Hielscher
    • 3
  • Daniel Schrimpf
    • 1
    • 2
  • Annekathrin Reinhardt
    • 1
    • 2
  • Annika K. Wefers
    • 1
    • 2
  • David Reuss
    • 1
    • 2
  • David T. W. Jones
    • 4
    • 5
  • Melanie Bewerunge-Hudler
    • 6
  • Christian Hartmann
    • 7
  • Peter Baumgarten
    • 8
    • 9
  • Hans-Georg Wirsching
    • 10
  • Bjarne Winther-Kristensen
    • 11
    • 12
  • Benjamin Brokinkel
    • 13
  • Ralf Ketter
    • 14
  • Miguel Angel Idoate Gastearena
    • 15
  • Katrin Lamszus
    • 16
  • Marcel Seiz-Rosenhagen
    • 17
  • Christian Mawrin
    • 18
  • Patrick N. Harter
    • 8
    • 19
  • Jörg Felsberg
    • 20
    • 21
  • Daniel Hänggi
    • 17
  • Christel Herold-Mende
    • 22
  • Anna Sophie Berghoff
    • 23
  • Michael Weller
    • 10
  • Stefan M. Pfister
    • 4
    • 24
    • 25
  • Wolfgang Wick
    • 26
    • 27
  • Guido Reifenberger
    • 20
    • 21
  • Matthias Preusser
    • 23
  • Andreas von Deimling
    • 1
    • 2
  • Felix Sahm
    • 1
    • 2
    • 4
  1. 1.Department of Neuropathology, Institute of PathologyUniversity Hospital HeidelbergHeidelbergGermany
  2. 2.Clinical Cooperation Unit NeuropathologyGerman Consortium for Translational Cancer Research (DKTK), German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ)HeidelbergGermany
  3. 3.Division of BiostatisticsGerman Cancer Research Center (DKFZ)HeidelbergGermany
  4. 4.Hopp Children’s Cancer Center at the NCT Heidelberg (KiTZ)HeidelbergGermany
  5. 5.Pediatric Glioma Research GroupGerman Consortium for Translational Cancer Research (DKTK), German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ)HeidelbergGermany
  6. 6.Genomics and Proteomics Core Facility, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ)HeidelbergGermany
  7. 7.Department of NeuropathologyInstitute of Pathology, Hannover Medical School (MHH)HannoverGermany
  8. 8.Institute of Neurology (Edinger Institute), University Hospital and Medical FacultyGoethe UniversityFrankfurtGermany
  9. 9.Department of Neurosurgery, University Hospital and Medical FacultyGoethe UniversityFrankfurtGermany
  10. 10.Department of NeurologyUniversity Hospital and University of ZurichZurichSwitzerland
  11. 11.Department of PathologyOdense University HospitalOdenseDenmark
  12. 12.Department of Clinical ResearchUniversity of Southern DenmarkOdenseDenmark
  13. 13.Department of NeurosurgeryUniversity Hospital MünsterMünsterGermany
  14. 14.Department of NeurosurgeryUniversity Hospital SaarlandHomburg, SaarGermany
  15. 15.Department of PathologyClínica Universidad de NavarraPamplonaSpain
  16. 16.Department of NeurosurgeryUniversity Medical Center Hamburg-EppendorfHamburgGermany
  17. 17.Department of Neurosurgery, University Medical Centre MannheimUniversity of HeidelbergMannheimGermany
  18. 18.Department of NeuropathologyUniversity MagdeburgMagdeburgGermany
  19. 19.German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), Partner Site Frankfurt/MainzFrankfurtGermany
  20. 20.Institute of NeuropathologyHeinrich Heine UniversityDüsseldorfGermany
  21. 21.German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), Partner Site Essen/DüsseldorfDüsseldorfGermany
  22. 22.Division of Experimental Neurosurgery, Department of NeurosurgeryUniversity Hospital HeidelbergHeidelbergGermany
  23. 23.Clinical Division of Oncology, Department of Medicine I, Comprehensive Cancer Center ViennaMedical University of ViennaViennaAustria
  24. 24.Division of Pediatric NeurooncologyGerman Cancer Consortium (DKTK), German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ)HeidelbergGermany
  25. 25.Department of Pediatric Oncology, Hematology, Immunology and PulmonologyUniversity Hospital HeidelbergHeidelbergGermany
  26. 26.Department of Neurology and Neurooncology Program, National Center for Tumor DiseasesHeidelberg University HospitalHeidelbergGermany
  27. 27.Clinical Cooperation Unit NeurooncologyGerman Consortium for Translational Cancer Research (DKTK), German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ)HeidelbergGermany

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