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Acta Neuropathologica

, Volume 134, Issue 4, pp 667–669 | Cite as

Brainstem angiocentric gliomas with MYB–QKI rearrangements

  • Laura D’Aronco
  • Cécile Rouleau
  • Tenzin Gayden
  • Louis Crevier
  • Jean-Claude Décarie
  • Sébastien Perreault
  • Nada Jabado
  • Pratiti Bandopadhayay
  • Keith L. Ligon
  • Benjamin EllezamEmail author
Correspondence

Introduction

Angiocentric glioma is a low-grade CNS tumor typically found in the cerebral hemispheres where it causes refractory epilepsy [3]. Surgical resection is often sufficient for seizure control and the rate of tumor recurrence is low [1]. On pathology, this neoplasm shares some cytologic features with pilocytic astrocytoma but is differentiated by its specific vascular polarity, its infiltrative growth pattern, and its epithelial membrane antigen (EMA) immunoreactivity [3]. In an initial study, a MYB–QKI rearrangement was present in 6 of 7 angiocentric gliomas and absent in 147 other gliomas, making it a potential diagnostic marker in ambiguous or atypical cases [2]. A subsequent study of a large number of cerebral low-grade gliomas confirmed the specificity of MYB–QKI rearrangements for angiocentric gliomas [5]. A midbrain tumor resembling angiocentric glioma was previously reported but the presence of the rearrangement was not assessed [4]. Here, we report two cases of...

References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Laura D’Aronco
    • 1
  • Cécile Rouleau
    • 2
    • 3
  • Tenzin Gayden
    • 3
  • Louis Crevier
    • 4
  • Jean-Claude Décarie
    • 5
  • Sébastien Perreault
    • 6
  • Nada Jabado
    • 3
  • Pratiti Bandopadhayay
    • 2
    • 3
  • Keith L. Ligon
    • 7
  • Benjamin Ellezam
    • 1
    Email author
  1. 1.Department of Pathology, Sainte-Justine HospitalUniversité de MontréalMontréalCanada
  2. 2.Department of PediatricsMcGill University and McGill University Heath Centre Research InstituteMontréalCanada
  3. 3.Department of Pediatric Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer InstituteBoston Children’s HospitalBostonUSA
  4. 4.Department of Surgery, Sainte-Justine HospitalUniversité de MontréalMontréalCanada
  5. 5.Department of Radiology, Sainte-Justine HospitalUniversité de MontréalMontréalCanada
  6. 6.Department of Pediatrics, Sainte-Justine HospitalUniversité de MontréalMontréalCanada
  7. 7.Department of Pathology, Dana-Farber Cancer InstituteBoston Children’s HospitalBostonUSA

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