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Acta Neuropathologica

, Volume 134, Issue 1, pp 155–158 | Cite as

Meningiomas induced by low-dose radiation carry structural variants of NF2 and a distinct mutational signature

  • Felix Sahm
  • Umut H. Toprak
  • Daniel Hübschmann
  • Kortine Kleinheinz
  • Ivo Buchhalter
  • Martin Sill
  • Damian Stichel
  • Matthias Schick
  • Melanie Bewerunge-Hudler
  • Daniel Schrimpf
  • Gelareh Zadeh
  • Ken Aldape
  • Christel Herold-Mende
  • Katja Beck
  • Ori Staszewski
  • Marco Prinz
  • Carmit Ben Harosh
  • Roland Eils
  • Dominik Sturm
  • David T. W. Jones
  • Stefan M. Pfister
  • Werner Paulus
  • Zvi Ram
  • Matthias Schlesner
  • Rachel Grossman
  • Andreas von Deimling
Correspondence

Meningiomas not only occur sporadically or in the context of neurofibromatosis type 2, but can also be induced by radiation [7]. High-dose radiation-induced meningiomas (Mrad) predominantly arise after radiation for other brain tumors (often in childhood) with doses of 40–60 Gy. Most low-dose Mrad have been detected in patients receiving 3–4 Gy to the scalp for tinea capitis [6, 9]. Analysis of these tumors is paradigmatic for radiation-induced tumorigenesis, particularly in the absence of a prior tumor and chemotherapy and a model for collateral exposure surrounding the target of high-dose irradiation. So far, little molecular overlap between Mrad and sporadic meningiomas has been detected [6, 9].

We here performed whole genome sequencing of 20 meningiomas induced by low-dose radiation (L-Mrad). Age, gender, and WHO grade are given in the supplementary tables. However, the documentation lacked the date of irradiation and the exact histological subtype, which could also not be...

Keywords

Meningioma Radiation-induced tumors Mutational signatures NF2 

Notes

Acknowledgements

We thank H-Y Nguyen, L Dörner, J Baron, K Lindenberg, U Lass, and J Meyer for skillful technical assistance and the Genome and Proteome Core Facility, High-Throughput Sequencing Unit of the DKFZ. This work was supported by the German Cancer Aid (110670, 110983), the Else Kröner-Fresenius Foundation (A_60), the DKFZ-HIPO through H033, the Hartmut Hoffmann-Berling International Graduate School (DH), the MD/PhD-program of the University Heidelberg (DH), and the Helmholtz International Graduate School for Cancer Research (UHT).

Supplementary material

401_2017_1715_MOESM1_ESM.docx (62 kb)
Supplementary material 1 (DOCX 61 kb)
401_2017_1715_MOESM2_ESM.xlsx (472 kb)
Supplementary material 2 (XLSX 471 kb)
401_2017_1715_MOESM3_ESM.pdf (4.4 mb)
Supplementary material 3 (PDF 4553 kb)

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Felix Sahm
    • 1
    • 2
  • Umut H. Toprak
    • 3
  • Daniel Hübschmann
    • 3
    • 4
    • 5
  • Kortine Kleinheinz
    • 3
  • Ivo Buchhalter
    • 3
  • Martin Sill
    • 6
  • Damian Stichel
    • 2
  • Matthias Schick
    • 7
  • Melanie Bewerunge-Hudler
    • 7
  • Daniel Schrimpf
    • 1
    • 2
  • Gelareh Zadeh
    • 8
    • 9
  • Ken Aldape
    • 8
    • 10
  • Christel Herold-Mende
    • 11
  • Katja Beck
    • 12
  • Ori Staszewski
    • 13
  • Marco Prinz
    • 13
    • 14
  • Carmit Ben Harosh
    • 15
  • Roland Eils
    • 3
    • 4
    • 12
  • Dominik Sturm
    • 5
    • 16
  • David T. W. Jones
    • 16
  • Stefan M. Pfister
    • 5
    • 16
  • Werner Paulus
    • 17
  • Zvi Ram
    • 15
    • 18
  • Matthias Schlesner
    • 3
  • Rachel Grossman
    • 15
    • 18
  • Andreas von Deimling
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Neuropathology, Institute of PathologyUniversity Hospital HeidelbergHeidelbergGermany
  2. 2.Clinical Cooperation Unit Neuropathology, German Consortium for Translational Cancer Research (DKTK)German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ)HeidelbergGermany
  3. 3.Division of Theoretical Bioinformatics (B080)German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ)HeidelbergGermany
  4. 4.Department for Bioinformatics and Functional Genomics, Institute for Pharmacy and Molecular Biotechnology (IPMB) and BioQuantHeidelberg UniversityHeidelbergGermany
  5. 5.Department of Pediatric Immunology, Hematology and OncologyUniversity Hospital HeidelbergHeidelbergGermany
  6. 6.Division of BiostatisticsGerman Cancer Research Center (DKFZ)HeidelbergGermany
  7. 7.Genomics and Proteomics Core Facility, Microarray UnitGerman Cancer Research Center (DKFZ)HeidelbergGermany
  8. 8.McFeeters-Hamilton Centre for Neuro-oncologyPrincess Margaret Cancer CentreTorontoCanada
  9. 9.Division of Neurosurgery, Department of SurgeryUniversity of TorontoTorontoCanada
  10. 10.Department of Laboratory Medicine and PathobiologyUniversity of TorontoTorontoCanada
  11. 11.Division of Experimental Neurosurgery, Department of NeurosurgeryUniversity Hospital HeidelbergHeidelbergGermany
  12. 12.Heidelberg Center for Personalised Oncology (DKFZ-HIPO)German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ)HeidelbergGermany
  13. 13.Institute of Neuropathology, Faculty of MedicineUniversity of FreiburgFreiburgGermany
  14. 14.BIOSS Centre for Biological Signalling StudiesUniversity of FreiburgFreiburgGermany
  15. 15.Department of NeurosurgeryTel-Aviv Medical CenterTel-AvivIsrael
  16. 16.Division of Pediatric Neurooncology, German Consortium for Translational Cancer Research (DKTK)German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ)HeidelbergGermany
  17. 17.Institute of NeuropathologyUniversity Hospital MuensterMuensterGermany
  18. 18.Sackler School of MedicineTel-Aviv UniversityTel-AvivIsrael

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