Advertisement

Acta Neuropathologica

, Volume 132, Issue 6, pp 935–937 | Cite as

Multimodal evaluation demonstrates in vivo 18F-AV-1451 uptake in autopsy-confirmed corticobasal degeneration

  • Corey T. McMillan
  • David J. Irwin
  • Ilya Nasrallah
  • Jeffrey S. Phillips
  • Meredith Spindler
  • Katya Rascovsky
  • Kylie Ternes
  • Charles Jester
  • David A. Wolk
  • Linda K. Kwong
  • Virginia M.-Y. Lee
  • Edward B. Lee
  • John Q. Trojanowski
  • Murray Grossman
Correspondence

Corticobasal degeneration (CBD) is characterized by 4-repeat misfolded tau (4Rtau) including astrocytic plaques, threads, and neuronal tangles [1]. 18F-AV-1451 is a PET radioligand that achieves in vivo binding in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) [8] and autoradiographic evidence of binding to paired helical filaments (PHFs) composed of 3-repeat misfolded tau (3Rtau) and 4Rtau characteristic of AD histopathology [4, 5, 7]. However, autoradiographic studies of 18F-AV-1451 on CBD postmortem tissue failed to demonstrate binding in cortical regions [5, 7], though there was minimal pathology in one study (<1.1 % tau-load) [7]. Another study suggests minimal, but present, autoradiographic binding of 18F-AV-1451 for 4Rtau [4]. Given mixed autoradiographic evidence in CBD, there is a need for in vivo evaluations of 18F-AV-1451 in patients with pathological confirmation.

We report a multimodal evaluation of a 58-year-old male with autopsy-confirmed CBD. He participated in in vivo baseline (15 months...

Keywords

Grey Matter Volume Globus Pallidus Progressive Supranuclear Palsy Corticobasal Degeneration Deep Grey Matter 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgements

This work was supported in part by the National Institutes of Health (NIH; AG043503; AG017586; AG10124) and the Dana Foundation. PET imaging data acquisition was supported by AVID Radiopharmaceuticals (Philadelphia, PA, USA), a wholly owned subsidiary of Eli Lilly and Company.

Supplementary material

401_2016_1640_MOESM1_ESM.pdf (8.5 mb)
Supplementary material 1 (PDF 8751 kb)

References

  1. 1.
    Dickson DW, Kouri N, Murray ME, Josephs KA (2011) Neuropathology of frontotemporal lobar degeneration-tau (FTLD-tau). J Mol Neurosci 45:384–389CrossRefPubMedPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Johnson KA, Sperling RA, Gidicsin CM, Carmasin JS, Maye JE, Coleman RE et al (2013) Florbetapir (F18-AV-45) PET to assess amyloid burden in Alzheimer’s disease dementia, mild cognitive impairment, and normal aging. Alzheimers Dement 9:S72–S83CrossRefPubMedPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Josephs KA, Whitwell JL, Tacik P, Duffy JR, Senjem ML, Tosakulwong N, et al (2016) [18F]AV-1451 tau-PET uptake does correlate with quantitatively measured 4R-tau burden in autopsy-confirmed corticobasal degeneration. Acta Neuropathol. doi: 10.1007/s00401-016-1618-1 Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Lowe VJ, Curran G, Fang P, Liesinger AM, Josephs KA, Parisi JE et al (2016) An autoradiographic evaluation of AV-1451 Tau PET in dementia. Acta Neuropathol Commun 4:58. doi: 10.1186/s40478-016-0315-6 CrossRefPubMedPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Marquié M, Normandin MD, Vanderburg CR, Costantino IM, Bien EA, Rycyna LG et al (2015) Validating novel tau positron emission tomography tracer [F-18]-AV-1451 (T807) on postmortem brain tissue. Ann Neurol 78:787–800CrossRefPubMedPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    McMillan CT, Boyd C, Gross RG, Weinstein J, Firn K, Toledo JB et al (2016) Multimodal imaging evidence of pathology-mediated disease distribution in corticobasal syndrome. Neurology 87:1227–1234CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    Sander K, Lashley T, Gami P, Gendron T, Lythgoe MF, Rohrer JD, et al (2016) Characterization of tau positron emission tomography tracer [(18)F]AV-1451 binding to postmortem tissue in Alzheimer’s disease, primary tauopathies, and other dementias. Alzheimers Dement. doi: 10.1016/j.jalz.2016.01.003 PubMedGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    Sepulcre J, Schultz AP, Sabuncu M, Gomez-Isla T, Chhatwal J, Becker A et al (2016) In vivo tau, amyloid, and gray matter profiles in the aging brain. J Neurosci 36:7364–7374CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  9. 9.
    Smith R, Puschmann A, Schöll M, Ohlsson T, van Swieten J, Honer M et al (2016) 18F-AV-1451 tau PET imaging correlates strongly with tau neuropathology in MAPT mutation carriers. Brain 139:2372–2379CrossRefPubMedPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Corey T. McMillan
    • 1
  • David J. Irwin
    • 1
  • Ilya Nasrallah
    • 2
  • Jeffrey S. Phillips
    • 1
  • Meredith Spindler
    • 1
  • Katya Rascovsky
    • 1
  • Kylie Ternes
    • 1
  • Charles Jester
    • 1
  • David A. Wolk
    • 1
  • Linda K. Kwong
    • 3
  • Virginia M.-Y. Lee
    • 3
  • Edward B. Lee
    • 3
  • John Q. Trojanowski
    • 3
  • Murray Grossman
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Neurology, Perelman School of MedicineUniversity of PennsylvaniaPhiladelphiaUSA
  2. 2.Department of Radiology, Perelman School of MedicineUniversity of PennsylvaniaPhiladelphiaUSA
  3. 3.Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine and Center for Neurodegenerative Disease Research, Perelman School of MedicineUniversity of PennsylvaniaPhiladelphiaUSA

Personalised recommendations