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Acta Neuropathologica

, Volume 132, Issue 6, pp 931–933 | Cite as

[18F]AV-1451 tau-PET uptake does correlate with quantitatively measured 4R-tau burden in autopsy-confirmed corticobasal degeneration

  • Keith A. JosephsEmail author
  • Jennifer L. Whitwell
  • Pawel Tacik
  • Joseph R. Duffy
  • Matthew L. Senjem
  • Nirubol Tosakulwong
  • Clifford R. Jack
  • Val Lowe
  • Dennis W. Dickson
  • Melissa E. Murray
Correspondence

Corticobasal degeneration (CBD) is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by the deposition of abnormally hyperphosphorylated 4-repeat (4R) tau in the brain [3]. Recent advances in molecular neuroimaging include the production of positron emission tomography (PET) ligands that bind to abnormal tau in the brain. One such ligand, [18F]AV-1451, has been shown to bind to abnormal 3R + 4R tau in diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease [2]. In addition, one case report found an association between antemortem [18F]AV-1451 and tau burden in an autopsied case with a mutation in the microtubule-associated protein tau gene with 3R + 4R tau [9]. Autoradiographic studies however have found very little, if any, binding in diseases characterized by 4R-tau including CBD [6, 7, 8], and no PET-autopsy studies have been published for a 4R-tau disease.

We assessed the relationship between [18F]AV-1451 uptake on PET with tau burden at autopsy, and with measures of neurodegeneration from...

Keywords

Positron Emission Tomography Grey Matter Volume Standard Uptake Ratio Ideomotor Apraxia Rolandic Operculum 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgments

This study was supported by NIH Grants R01-NS89757 (PI, Josephs) and R01-DC12519 (PI, Whitwell).

Supplementary material

401_2016_1618_MOESM1_ESM.docx (35 kb)
Supplementary material 1 (DOCX 35 kb)
401_2016_1618_MOESM2_ESM.docx (27 kb)
Supplementary material 2 (DOCX 26 kb)

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Keith A. Josephs
    • 1
    Email author
  • Jennifer L. Whitwell
    • 2
  • Pawel Tacik
    • 6
  • Joseph R. Duffy
    • 3
  • Matthew L. Senjem
    • 4
  • Nirubol Tosakulwong
    • 5
  • Clifford R. Jack
    • 2
  • Val Lowe
    • 2
  • Dennis W. Dickson
    • 6
  • Melissa E. Murray
    • 6
  1. 1.Department of Neurology, Division of Behavioral Neurology and Movement DisordersMayo ClinicRochesterUSA
  2. 2.Department of RadiologyMayo ClinicRochesterUSA
  3. 3.Department of Neurology, Division of Speech PathologyMayo ClinicRochesterUSA
  4. 4.Department of Information TechnologyMayo ClinicRochesterUSA
  5. 5.Department of Health Sciences ResearchMayo ClinicRochesterUSA
  6. 6.Department of NeuroscienceMayo ClinicJacksonvilleUSA

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