Acta Neuropathologica

, Volume 130, Issue 5, pp 661–678

Short-term suppression of A315T mutant human TDP-43 expression improves functional deficits in a novel inducible transgenic mouse model of FTLD-TDP and ALS

  • Yazi D. Ke
  • Annika van Hummel
  • Claire H. Stevens
  • Amadeus Gladbach
  • Stefania Ippati
  • Mian Bi
  • Wei S. Lee
  • Sarah Krüger
  • Julia van der Hoven
  • Alexander Volkerling
  • Andre Bongers
  • Glenda Halliday
  • Nikolas K. Haass
  • Matthew Kiernan
  • Fabien Delerue
  • Lars M. Ittner
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s00401-015-1486-0

Cite this article as:
Ke, Y.D., van Hummel, A., Stevens, C.H. et al. Acta Neuropathol (2015) 130: 661. doi:10.1007/s00401-015-1486-0

Abstract

The nuclear transactive response DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43) undergoes relocalization to the cytoplasm with formation of cytoplasmic deposits in neurons in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). Pathogenic mutations in the TDP-43-encoding TARDBP gene in familial ALS as well as non-mutant human TDP-43 have been utilized to model FTD/ALS in cell culture and animals, including mice. Here, we report novel A315T mutant TDP-43 transgenic mice, iTDP-43A315T, with controlled neuronal over-expression. Constitutive expression of human TDP-43A315T resulted in pronounced early-onset and progressive neurodegeneration, which was associated with compromised motor performance, spatial memory and disinhibition. Muscle atrophy resulted in reduced grip strength. Cortical degeneration presented with pronounced astrocyte activation. Using differential protein extraction from iTDP-43A315T brains, we found cytoplasmic localization, fragmentation, phosphorylation and ubiquitination and insolubility of TDP-43. Surprisingly, suppression of human TDP-43A315T expression in mice with overt neurodegeneration for only 1 week was sufficient to significantly improve motor and behavioral deficits, and reduce astrogliosis. Our data suggest that functional deficits in iTDP-43A315T mice are at least in part a direct and transient effect of the presence of TDP-43A315T. Furthermore, it illustrates the compensatory capacity of compromised neurons once transgenic TDP-43 is removed, with implications for future treatments.

Keywords

TDP-43 Frontotemporal lobar degeneration Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis Mouse model Pathogenic mutation 

Supplementary material

401_2015_1486_MOESM1_ESM.pdf (124 kb)
Pole test deficits in 3 month-old iTDP-43A315T mice. Vertical pole test: Both 3 month-old mThy1.2-tTA(6)/pTRE-TDP-43A315T(13) and mThy1.2-tTA(15)/pTRE-TDP-43A315T(13) mice required significantly more time to reach the bottom when placed at the top of the pole, as compared to single transgenic mThy1.2-tTA(15), mThy1.2-tTA(6) and pTRE-TDP-43A315T(13), and non-transgenic (non-tg) control mice (***, P < 0.001, n = 14 (non-tg), n = 14 (pTRE-TDP-43A315T(13)), n = 6 (pTRE-TDP-43A315T(6)), n = 9 (mThy1.2-tTA(15)), n = 7 (mThy1.2-tTA(6)/pTRE-TDP-43A315T(13)), n = 10 (mThy1.2-tTA(15)/pTRE-TDP-43A315T(13)))
401_2015_1486_MOESM2_ESM.pdf (159 kb)
No overt microglial activation in iTDP-43A315T mice. Numbers and appearance of IBA-1-positive (green) microglia was indistinguishable in the cortex and hippocampus of mThy1.2-tTA(6)/pTRE-TDP-43A315T(13) iTDP-43A315T and single transgenic pTRE-TDP-43A315T(13) control (ctr) mice at 4.5 months of age. Human TDP-43 (hTDP-43) staining showed transgene expression in iTDP-43A315T mice. Scale bars, 100 µm

Funding information

Funder NameGrant NumberFunding Note
National Health and Medical Research Council
  • 1081916
  • 1037746
  • 1003083
  • 1079679
National Health and Medical Research Council
  • 1020562
Australian Research Council
  • 1096674
  • 130102027
  • 130101591
Motor Neuron Disease Australia
    University of New South Wales

      Copyright information

      © Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2015

      Authors and Affiliations

      • Yazi D. Ke
        • 1
        • 2
      • Annika van Hummel
        • 1
        • 2
      • Claire H. Stevens
        • 1
      • Amadeus Gladbach
        • 1
      • Stefania Ippati
        • 1
      • Mian Bi
        • 1
      • Wei S. Lee
        • 1
      • Sarah Krüger
        • 1
      • Julia van der Hoven
        • 1
      • Alexander Volkerling
        • 1
      • Andre Bongers
        • 3
      • Glenda Halliday
        • 4
      • Nikolas K. Haass
        • 5
      • Matthew Kiernan
        • 6
      • Fabien Delerue
        • 1
        • 7
      • Lars M. Ittner
        • 1
        • 4
        • 7
      1. 1.Dementia Research Unit, Department of Anatomy, Faculty of Medicine, School of Medical SciencesUNSW AustraliaSydneyAustralia
      2. 2.Motor Neuron Disease Unit, Department of Anatomy, Faculty of Medicine, School of Medical SciencesUNSW AustraliaSydneyAustralia
      3. 3.Biological Resources Imaging Laboratory, Mark Wainwright Analytical CentreUNSW AustraliaSydneyAustralia
      4. 4.Neuroscience Research AustraliaSydneyAustralia
      5. 5.The University of Queensland Diamantina Institute, Translational Research InstituteThe University of QueenslandBrisbaneAustralia
      6. 6.Brain and Mind Research Institute, Faculty of Medicine, Sydney Medical SchoolThe University of SydneySydneyAustralia
      7. 7.Transgenic Animal Unit, Mark Wainwright Analytical CentreUNSW AustraliaSydneyAustralia

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