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Acta Neuropathologica

, Volume 129, Issue 3, pp 463–465 | Cite as

Therapeutic use of CCR5 antagonists is supported by strong expression of CCR5 on CD8+ T cells in progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy-associated immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome

  • Guillaume Martin-BlondelEmail author
  • Jan Bauer
  • Emmanuelle Uro-Coste
  • Damien Biotti
  • Delphine Averseng-Peaureaux
  • Nelly Fabre
  • Hervé Dumas
  • Fabrice Bonneville
  • Hans Lassmann
  • Bruno Marchou
  • Roland S. Liblau
  • David Brassat
Correspondence
Therapeutic strategies that modulate the deleterious immune response underlying progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy-associated immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (PML-IRIS) are warranted [ 5]. Maraviroc, an antagonist of the CCR5 chemokine receptor that entered recently the HIV armamentarium, has been suggested to be beneficial in preventing or treating PML-IRIS [ 1, 4]. Since chemokine receptors play an important role in inflammatory cell migration, we investigated whether the molecular target of maraviroc is expressed on pathogenic T cells infiltrating PML-IRIS lesions. Paraffin-embedded brain specimens of inflammatory PML, obtained through diagnostic stereotactic brain biopsy, were analyzed from five previously described HIV-infected patients who developed PML-IRIS after initiation of antiretroviral therapy (ART) [ 3], and two non-HIV-infected patients who developed PML after chemotherapy or natalizumab, one who developed PML-IRIS, and the other at high risk of...

Keywords

Multiple Sclerosis Multiple Sclerosis Patient Natalizumab Maraviroc CCR5 Chemokine Receptor 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgments

We thank Dr. V. Sazdovitch, Paris, France, for providing some tissue samples. This work was supported by the French National Institute for Medical Research (INSERM), the Agence Nationale pour la Recherche sur le Sida et les hépatites virales (ANRS), the Association pour la Recherche sur la Sclérose en Plaques (ARSEP), the Collège des Universitaires de Maladies Infectieuses et Tropicales (CMIT) and the Best-MS network, a FP7 network, Grant agreement No: 305477.

Supplementary material

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Guillaume Martin-Blondel
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    Email author
  • Jan Bauer
    • 4
  • Emmanuelle Uro-Coste
    • 3
    • 5
    • 6
  • Damien Biotti
    • 7
  • Delphine Averseng-Peaureaux
    • 3
    • 7
  • Nelly Fabre
    • 7
  • Hervé Dumas
    • 8
  • Fabrice Bonneville
    • 3
    • 8
  • Hans Lassmann
    • 4
  • Bruno Marchou
    • 1
    • 3
  • Roland S. Liblau
    • 2
    • 3
  • David Brassat
    • 2
    • 3
    • 7
  1. 1.Department of Infectious and Tropical DiseasesToulouse University HospitalToulouseFrance
  2. 2.INSERM U1043-CNRS UMR 5282Centre de Physiopathologie Toulouse-PurpanToulouse Cedex 9France
  3. 3.Université Toulouse IIIToulouseFrance
  4. 4.Center for Brain ResearchMedical University of ViennaViennaAustria
  5. 5.Department of PathologyToulouse University HospitalToulouseFrance
  6. 6.INSERM, CRCT U1087ToulouseFrance
  7. 7.Department of Neurology, Pole des NeurosciencesToulouse University HospitalToulouseFrance
  8. 8.Department of NeuroradiologyToulouse University HospitalToulouseFrance

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