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Acta Neuropathologica

, Volume 126, Issue 6, pp 939–941 | Cite as

TERT promoter mutations rather than methylation are the main mechanism for TERT upregulation in adult gliomas

  • Hideyuki Arita
  • Yoshitaka Narita
  • Hirokazu Takami
  • Shintaro Fukushima
  • Yuko Matsushita
  • Akihiko Yoshida
  • Yasuji Miyakita
  • Makoto Ohno
  • Soichiro Shibui
  • Koichi Ichimura
Correspondence

Telomere lengthening (TL) is mandatory for infinite proliferation of many cancer cells. This is generally achieved either by telomerase activation or in some cases by telomerase-independent alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT) [3]. Recently, recurrent mutations at two hotspots termed C228T and C250T in the promoter region of TERT, a catalytic subunit of telomerase, have been reported in various types of cancers [1, 6, 7, 9, 12]. These mutations result in upregulation of TERT expression [1, 7], which is required for telomerase activation [11]. TERT promoter mutations are particularly common in adult gliomas [1, 9]. It is also known that a subset of astrocytomas harbors mutations of ATRX, which could lead to ALT [10].

We have previously shown that glioblastomas with TERT mutation had TERT mRNA upregulation [1]. We have also observed TERT upregulation in some tumors without mutations in the hotspots. A small subset of tumors had neither TERT nor ATRX mutations [9]. Recently, it has...

Keywords

Methylation Status Methylation Level Promoter Mutation Oligodendroglial Tumor TERT Promoter Mutation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgments

This work was supported in part by Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research from the Ministry of Education, Science and Culture of Japan [No. 24659650 (H.A.)], and by the National Cancer Center Research and Development Fund [23-A-50 (K.I.)]. The authors thank Dr Sylvia Kocialkowski for critical reading of the manuscript.

Supplementary material

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hideyuki Arita
    • 1
  • Yoshitaka Narita
    • 1
  • Hirokazu Takami
    • 2
    • 3
  • Shintaro Fukushima
    • 2
  • Yuko Matsushita
    • 1
  • Akihiko Yoshida
    • 4
  • Yasuji Miyakita
    • 1
  • Makoto Ohno
    • 1
  • Soichiro Shibui
    • 1
  • Koichi Ichimura
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Neurosurgery and Neuro-OncologyNational Cancer Center HospitalTokyoJapan
  2. 2.Division of Brain Tumor Translational ResearchNational Cancer Center Research InstituteTokyoJapan
  3. 3.Department of NeurosurgeryUniversity of TokyoTokyoJapan
  4. 4.Department of Pathology and Clinical LaboratoriesNational Cancer Center HospitalTokyoJapan

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