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European Journal of Nutrition

, Volume 54, Issue 3, pp 437–445 | Cite as

Comparison of two food record-based dietary assessment methods for a pan-European food consumption survey among infants, toddlers, and children using data quality indicators

  • Heinz Freisling
  • Marga C. Ocké
  • Corinne Casagrande
  • Geneviève Nicolas
  • Sandra P. Crispim
  • Maryse Niekerk
  • Jan van der Laan
  • Evelien de Boer
  • Stefanie Vandevijvere
  • Mieke de Maeyer
  • Jiri Ruprich
  • Marcela Dofkova
  • Inge Huybrechts
  • Ellen Trolle
  • Nadia Slimani
Original Contribution

Abstract

Purpose

We aimed (1) to describe and evaluate the “EPIC-Soft DataEntry” application developed as a user-friendly data entry tool for pan-European and national food consumption surveys among infants and children, and (2) to compare two food record-based dietary assessment methods in terms of food description and quantification using data quality indicators. EPIC-Soft DataEntry was used for both methods.

Methods

Two pilot studies were performed in both Belgium and Czech Republic in a total of 376 children (3 months to 10 year olds): one using a consecutive 3-day food diary; and the second with two non-consecutive 1-day food diaries with data entry during a completion interview. The collected dietary data were compared between the two dietary assessment methods by country and by age groups: (i) <1 year; (ii) 1–3 years; (iii) >3–10 years.

Results

Overall, 70 % of the interviewers evaluated the work with EPIC-Soft DataEntry as easy. With both dietary assessment methods, an equally high proportion of specific food names (e.g., “yoghurt, strawberry”) were reported, where only between 5 and 15 % of foods were non-specified (e.g., “yoghurt, n.s.”). The two 1-day food diaries yielded a higher proportion of foods with detailed description. For example, in the age category of 1–3 year olds in Belgium, for 7 out of 16 systematic questions on food description (e.g., “preservation method,”) specific answers were significantly higher (all P < 0.03). The proportion of missing quantities of consumed foods was comparable between the two methods.

Conclusions

The EPIC-Soft DataEntry application was positively evaluated by the majority of the interviewers. Two non-consecutive 1-day food diaries with data entry during a completion interview provide a more detailed description of consumed foods as compared with a 3-day food diary.

Keywords

Dietary assessment EPIC-Soft (GloboDiet) Children Infants Data quality Europe Dietary surveys Standardization 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The present study is a part of the PANCAKE project and has been funded in part by the European Food Safety Authority (CFP/EFSA/DATEX/2009/02). Sole responsibility lies with the authors. EFSA is not responsible for any use that may be made of the information contained therein, as stated by Article II.5—Publicity of the Amendment No. 1 to grant agreement CFP/EFSA/DATEX/2009/02. The PANCAKE project report is available at http://www.efsa.europa.eu/en/supporting/pub/339e.htm. As compared with the project report, we focus on specific aspects of the project in more detail including formal hypothesis testing. We thank all participants, interviewers, and other personnel for their important contributions to this study. The authors have no conflict of interest.

Supplementary material

394_2014_727_MOESM1_ESM.pdf (532 kb)
Supplementary material 1 (PDF 531 kb)
394_2014_727_MOESM2_ESM.pdf (23 kb)
Supplementary material 2 (PDF 22 kb)

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Heinz Freisling
    • 1
  • Marga C. Ocké
    • 2
  • Corinne Casagrande
    • 1
  • Geneviève Nicolas
    • 1
  • Sandra P. Crispim
    • 1
  • Maryse Niekerk
    • 2
  • Jan van der Laan
    • 2
  • Evelien de Boer
    • 2
  • Stefanie Vandevijvere
    • 3
  • Mieke de Maeyer
    • 4
  • Jiri Ruprich
    • 5
  • Marcela Dofkova
    • 5
  • Inge Huybrechts
    • 1
  • Ellen Trolle
    • 6
  • Nadia Slimani
    • 1
  1. 1.International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC-WHO)Lyon Cedex 08France
  2. 2.National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM)BilthovenThe Netherlands
  3. 3.Scientific Institute of Public Health (IPH)BrusselsBelgium
  4. 4.Department of Public HealthGhent UniversityGhentBelgium
  5. 5.National Institute of Public Health (NIPH)PragueCzech Republic
  6. 6.Technical University of Denmark (DTU)CopenhagenDenmark

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