European Journal of Nutrition

, Volume 46, Issue 2, pp 111–117

Plant stanol esters in low-fat milk products lower serum total and LDL cholesterol

  • Leena Seppo
  • Tiina Jauhiainen
  • Riikka Nevala
  • Tuija Poussa
  • Riitta Korpela
ORIGINAL CONTRIBUTION

Abstract

Background

Oil-based matrices enriched with plant stanol esters lower serum LDL cholesterol. The effects of low-fat milk products have been less thoroughly examined.

Aim of the study

To evaluate the effect of three less explored low-fat milk products enriched with plant stanol esters on serum lipid concentrations in subjects with mild or moderate hypercholesterolemia.

Methods

A meta-analysis of four unpublished sub-studies (yoghurt, yoghurt single-shot drink: Studies I and II, or milk). All the sub-studies were randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind and had a parallel-group design. They were carried out in order to evaluate the effect of low-fat milk products enriched with plant stanol esters on serum lipid concentration. Each stanol-ester-enriched milk product provided 2 g of stanols per day, and in each study the intervention period was 5 weeks. A total of 199 hypercholesterolemic subjects completed the studies.

Results

The pooled treatment difference in total cholesterol was −3.8% (95% CI −6.0 to −1.7, p < 0.001) when stanol was compared to placebo. In LDL cholesterol, the pooled treatment difference was −4.9% (95% CI −7.8 to −1.8, p = 0.002). There were no significant differences between the groups in pooled HDL cholesterol or triacylglycerol concentrations. The results tended to be more pronounced when we were certain that the yoghurt single-shot drink was ingested with lunch, and when the baseline LDL-cholesterol concentration was ≥3.5 mmol/l.

Conclusions

These results imply that low-fat milk products enriched with plant stanol esters lower both total cholesterol and LDL cholesterol statistically significantly in subjects with mild or moderate hypercholesterolemia. The changes tended to relate to the baseline LDL-cholesterol concentration.

Keywords

phytosterols plant stanols hypercholesterolaemia low-fat milk products 

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Copyright information

© Steinkopff Verlag Darmstadt 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Leena Seppo
    • 1
  • Tiina Jauhiainen
    • 1
    • 2
  • Riikka Nevala
    • 2
  • Tuija Poussa
    • 3
  • Riitta Korpela
    • 1
    • 2
    • 4
  1. 1.Valio LtdHelsinkiFinland
  2. 2.Institute of Biomedicine, PharmacologyUniversity of HelsinkiHelsinkiFinland
  3. 3.Stat-ConsultingTampereFinland
  4. 4.Foundation for Nutrition ResearchHelsinkiFinland

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