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Clinical Research in Cardiology

, Volume 99, Issue 12, pp 861–863 | Cite as

Cor triatriatum dexter: rare case of neonatal cyanosis

  • Katarzyna Januszewska
  • Markus Loeff
  • Rainer Kozlik-Feldmann
  • Jörg Franke
  • Heinrich Netz
  • Edward Malec
  • Robert Dalla PozzaEmail author
Letter to the Editors
  • 111 Downloads

Sirs:

Cor triatriatum dexter is a very rare cardiac anomaly in which a membrane divides the right atrium into two chambers [1]. Depending on the degree of right atrial obstruction, the clinical sign of these anatomic variations may be neonatal cyanosis necessitating urgent surgical intervention; some patients are asymptomatic and reach adulthood without therapy [2]. Echocardiographic diagnosis can be difficult [1, 3]. We report on a newborn referred for severe neonatal cyanosis with the diagnosis of cor triatriatum dexter with obstruction of the right ventricular inflow. Surgical intervention led to complete recovery.

The male neonate was spontaneously born at 41 weeks of gestation after an uncomplicated pregnancy with a birth weight of 3550 g. After the initial uncomplicated situation, central cyanosis with a transcutaneous oxygen saturation of 85% led to admission to the neonatal intensive care unit. The echocardiographic evaluation revealed a large, floating membrane within the...

Keywords

Atrial Septal Defect Tricuspid Valve Atrial Septum Sinus Venosus Secundum Atrial Septal Defect 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Katarzyna Januszewska
    • 2
  • Markus Loeff
    • 1
  • Rainer Kozlik-Feldmann
    • 1
  • Jörg Franke
    • 3
  • Heinrich Netz
    • 1
  • Edward Malec
    • 2
  • Robert Dalla Pozza
    • 1
    Email author
  1. 1.Department of Pediatric Cardiology, Klinikum GroßhadernLudwig-Maximilians-UniversityMunichGermany
  2. 2.Department of Cardiac SurgeryLudwig-Maximilians-UniversityMunichGermany
  3. 3.Children’s ClinicKemptenGermany

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