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International Journal of Colorectal Disease

, Volume 31, Issue 8, pp 1451–1457 | Cite as

Cholecystectomy and the risk of colorectal cancer by tumor mismatch repair deficiency status

  • Jie Shang
  • Jeanette C. Reece
  • Daniel D. Buchanan
  • Graham G. Giles
  • Jane C. Figueiredo
  • Graham Casey
  • Steven Gallinger
  • Stephen N. Thibodeau
  • Noralane M. Lindor
  • Polly A. Newcomb
  • John D. Potter
  • John A. Baron
  • John L. Hopper
  • Mark A. Jenkins
  • Aung Ko Win
Original Article

Abstract

Purpose

Gallbladder diseases and cholecystectomy may play a role in the development of colorectal cancer (CRC). Our aim was to investigate the association between cholecystectomy and CRC risk overall and by sex, family history, anatomical location, and tumor mismatch repair (MMR) status.

Methods

This study comprised 5847 incident CRC cases recruited from population cancer registries in Australia, Canada, and the USA into the Colon Cancer Family Registry between 1997 and 2012 and 4970 controls with no personal history of CRC who were either randomly selected from the general population or were spouses of the cases. The association between cholecystectomy and CRC was estimated using logistic regression, after adjusting for confounding factors.

Results

Overall, there was no evidence for an association between cholecystectomy and CRC (odds ratio [OR] = 0.88, 95 % confidence interval 0.73, 1.08). In the stratified analyses, there was no evidence for a difference in the association between women and men (P = 0.54), between individuals with and without family history of CRC in first-degree relative (P = 0.64), between tumor anatomical locations (P = 0.45), or between MMR-proficient and MMR-deficient cases (P = 0.54).

Conclusion

Cholecystectomy is not a substantial risk factor for CRC, regardless of sex, family history, anatomical location, or tumor MMR status.

Keywords

Gallbladder Cholecystectomy Mismatch repair Colorectal cancer 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The authors thank all study participants of the Colon Cancer Family Registry and staff for their contributions to this project.

Compliance with ethical standards

Funding

This work was supported by grant UM1 CA167551 from the National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health (NIH), and through collaborating centers: Australasian Colorectal Cancer Family Registry (U01/U24 CA097735), Mayo Clinic Cooperative Family Registry for Colon Cancer Studies (U01/U24 CA074800), Ontario Familial Colorectal Cancer Registry (U01/U24 CA074783), and Seattle Colorectal Cancer Family Registry (U01/U24 CA074794).

Seattle Colorectal Cancer Family Registry research was also supported by the Cancer Surveillance System of the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, which was funded by control nos. N01-CN-67009 (1996–2003) and N01-PC-35142 (2003–2010) and contract no. HHSN2612013000121 (2010–2017) from the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) Program of the National Cancer Institute with additional support from the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center. The collection of cancer incidence data used in this study was supported by the California Department of Public Health as part of the statewide cancer reporting program mandated by California Health and Safety Code Section 103885, the National Cancer Institute’s Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results Program under contract HHSN261201000035C awarded to the University of Southern California. The ideas and opinions expressed herein are those of the author(s), and endorsement by the State of California, Department of Public Health the National Cancer Institute, or their contractors and subcontractors is not intended nor should be inferred.

This work was also supported by Centre for Research Excellence grant APP1042021 and program grant APP1074383 from the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC), Australia. AKW is a NHMRC Early Career Fellow. MAJ is a NHMRC Senior Research Fellow. JLH is a NHMRC Senior Principal Research Fellow. DDB is a University of Melbourne Research at Melbourne Accelerator Program (R@MAP) Senior Research Fellow.

Disclaimer

The content of this manuscript does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the National Cancer Institute or any of the collaborating centers in the CFRs, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the US Government or the CFR. Authors had full responsibility for the design of the study, the collection of the data, the analysis and interpretation of the data, the decision to submit the manuscript for publication, and the writing of the manuscript.

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jie Shang
    • 1
  • Jeanette C. Reece
    • 1
  • Daniel D. Buchanan
    • 1
    • 2
  • Graham G. Giles
    • 1
    • 3
  • Jane C. Figueiredo
    • 4
  • Graham Casey
    • 4
  • Steven Gallinger
    • 5
  • Stephen N. Thibodeau
    • 6
  • Noralane M. Lindor
    • 7
  • Polly A. Newcomb
    • 8
    • 9
  • John D. Potter
    • 8
    • 9
    • 10
  • John A. Baron
    • 11
  • John L. Hopper
    • 1
  • Mark A. Jenkins
    • 1
  • Aung Ko Win
    • 1
  1. 1.Centre for Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Melbourne School of Population and Global HealthThe University of MelbourneParkvilleAustralia
  2. 2.Colorectal Oncogenomics Group, Genetic Epidemiology Laboratory, Department of PathologyThe University of MelbourneParkvilleAustralia
  3. 3.Cancer Epidemiology CentreCancer Council VictoriaMelbourneAustralia
  4. 4.Keck School of Medicine, Norris Comprehensive Cancer CenterUniversity of Southern CaliforniaLos AngelesUSA
  5. 5.Lunenfeld Tanenbaum Research Institute, Mount Sinai HospitalUniversity of TorontoTorontoCanada
  6. 6.Molecular Genetics Laboratory, Department of Laboratory Medicine and PathologyMayo ClinicRochesterUSA
  7. 7.Department of Health Science ResearchMayo Clinic ArizonaScottsdaleUSA
  8. 8.Public Health Sciences DivisionFred Hutchinson Cancer Research CenterSeattleUSA
  9. 9.School of Public HealthUniversity of WashingtonSeattleUSA
  10. 10.Centre for Public Health ResearchMassey UniversityWellingtonNew Zealand
  11. 11.Department of MedicineUniversity of North CarolinaChapel HillUSA

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