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International Journal of Colorectal Disease

, Volume 31, Issue 5, pp 1069–1070 | Cite as

Interstitial cells of Cajal increased in patients with rectal prolapse

  • Pierpaolo Sileri
  • Luana Franceschilli
  • Sebastian Smolarek
  • Daniele Colombo
  • Federica Giorgi
  • Giulia Missori
  • Mostafa Shalaby
  • Augusto Orlandi
Letter to the Editor

Dear Editor:

Interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs), initially described as accessory neurons by the histologist Santiago Ramony Cajal, act as a pacemaker system for the intestinal musculature. Microscopically, ICCs are mainly bipolar with branched processes, connecting to each other and forming a network around the myenteric plexus, which is localized in the space between the circular and longitudinal muscle layers. In this network, the ICC is associated with the long axis of the surrounding smooth muscle cells, forming a syncytium. This complex is responsible for generating the movement of gastrointestinal muscle classically referred as “myogenic.” ICCs also express the receptor tyrosine kinase, c-Kit/CD117 antigen (c-Kit), the product of the CKIT gene. Immunohistochemical evaluation of the expression of this marker offers a simple and reliable method for identification of the number, distribution, and function of ICC networks, thus providing evidence that ICCs are pacemaker cells that...

Keywords

Lower Esophageal Sphincter Pelvic Floor Muscle Rectal Prolapse Circular Muscle Layer Longitudinal Muscle Layer 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Pierpaolo Sileri
    • 1
  • Luana Franceschilli
    • 1
  • Sebastian Smolarek
    • 1
  • Daniele Colombo
    • 2
  • Federica Giorgi
    • 1
  • Giulia Missori
    • 1
  • Mostafa Shalaby
    • 1
  • Augusto Orlandi
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of SurgeryUniversity of Rome Tor VergataRomeItaly
  2. 2.Department of Biomedicine and Prevention, Anatomic Pathology SectionUniversity of Rome Tor VergataRomeItaly

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