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Pediatric Surgery International

, Volume 35, Issue 5, pp 559–563 | Cite as

In prenatally diagnosed CPAM, does the affected lobe influence the timing of symptom onset?

  • R. SueyoshiEmail author
  • S. Shibuya
  • T. Ochi
  • M. Okawada
  • G. Miyano
  • H. Koga
  • G. J. Lane
  • A. Yamataka
Original Article
  • 72 Downloads

Abstract

Purpose

We investigated the relationship between the affected lobe and symptom onset in prenatally diagnosed congenital pulmonary airway malformation (CPAM).

Methods

53 CPAM patients diagnosed prenatally were reviewed retrospectively by creating 2 groups according to symptom onset. Group Sneo: (symptomatic during the neonatal period; n = 13) and group S > neo: (symptomatic after the neonatal period; n = 40) were compared for type of CPAM, affected lobes, types of symptoms/infections, treatment, duration of follow-up, and histopathology. Requirement for surgery (Sx) was then used to create three subgroups: Sneo + Sx, S > neo + Sx, and Sx−.

Results

Some cases had multiple affected lobes. In Sneo, symptoms developed in 55.6%, 50.0%, 0%, 0%, and 36.8% of right upper lobes (RUL), right middle lobes (RML), right lower lobes (RLL), left upper lobes (LUL), and left lower lobes (LLL) diagnosed with CPAM, prenatally. In S > neo, symptoms developed in 0%, 0%, 6.3%, 55.6%, and 33.3% of RUL, RML, RLL, LUL, and LLL diagnosed with CPAM, prenatally.

Conclusion

In prenatally diagnosed CPAM, RUL and RML lesions are more likely to become symptomatic in neonates, and LUL lesions in infants. Surgery is recommended before the onset of respiratory infections after 1 year of age.

Keywords

CPAM Neonatal lung infection Symptomatic lung lesion Pulmonary lobe morbidity Prenatal diagnosis Natural history pediatric lung disease 

Notes

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that there were no conflicts of interest.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. Sueyoshi
    • 1
    Email author
  • S. Shibuya
    • 1
  • T. Ochi
    • 1
  • M. Okawada
    • 1
  • G. Miyano
    • 1
  • H. Koga
    • 1
  • G. J. Lane
    • 1
  • A. Yamataka
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Pediatric General and Urogenital SurgeryJuntendo University School of MedicineTokyoJapan

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