Pediatric Surgery International

, Volume 32, Issue 9, pp 887–893 | Cite as

Risk factors and prevention for surgical intestinal disorders in extremely low birth weight infants

  • Masaya Yamoto
  • Yusuke Nakazawa
  • Koji Fukumoto
  • Hiromu Miyake
  • Hideaki Nakajima
  • Akinori Sekioka
  • Akiyoshi Nomura
  • Kei Ooyama
  • Yutaka Yamada
  • Katsushi Nogami
  • Yuko Van
  • Chisako Furuta
  • Reiji Nakano
  • Yasuhiko Tanaka
  • Naoto Urushihara
Original Article

Abstract

Purpose

Surgical intestinal disorders (SID), such as necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC), focal intestinal perforation (FIP), and meconium-related ileus (MRI), are serious morbidities in extremely low birth weight (ELBW, birth weight <1000 g) infants. From 2010, we performed enteral antifungal prophylaxis (EAP) in ELBWI to prevent for SID. The aim of this study was to identify disease-specific risk factors and to evaluate the efficacy of prevention for SID in ELBW infants.

Methods

A retrospective chart review of all consecutive patients between January 2006 and March 2015, which included 323 ELBW infants who were admitted to Shizuoka Children’s Hospital, was conducted.

Results

The number of infants with NEC, FIP, and MRI was 9, 12, and 13, respectively; 28 in 323 ELBW infants died. The control group defined the cases were not SID. In-hospital mortality was higher in infants with NEC relative to those in the control group. On logistic regression analysis, low gestational age and cardiac malformations were associated with increased risk of NEC. IUGR were associated with increased risk of MRI. EAP decreased risk of NEC and FIP. Low gestational weight and NEC were associated with increased risk of death.

Conclusion

Survival to hospital discharge after operation for NEC in ELBW infants remains poor. EAP decreased risk of NEC and FIP in ELBW infants.

Keywords

Surgical intestinal disorders Necrotizing enterocolitis Focal intestinal perforation Meconium-related ileus Enterally antifungal prophylaxis Extremely low birth weight infants 

Notes

Compliance wit ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflicts of interest.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Masaya Yamoto
    • 1
  • Yusuke Nakazawa
    • 2
  • Koji Fukumoto
    • 1
  • Hiromu Miyake
    • 1
  • Hideaki Nakajima
    • 1
  • Akinori Sekioka
    • 1
  • Akiyoshi Nomura
    • 1
  • Kei Ooyama
    • 1
  • Yutaka Yamada
    • 1
  • Katsushi Nogami
    • 2
  • Yuko Van
    • 2
  • Chisako Furuta
    • 2
  • Reiji Nakano
    • 2
  • Yasuhiko Tanaka
    • 2
  • Naoto Urushihara
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Pediatric SurgeryShizuoka Children’s HospitalShizuokaJapan
  2. 2.Department of NeonatalogyShizuoka Children’s HospitalShizuokaJapan

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