Pediatric Surgery International

, Volume 18, Issue 8, pp 668–672 | Cite as

Concealed penis

  • Jayant Radhakrishnan
  • Asim Razzaq
  • Kannan Manickam
Original article
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Abstract.

A small phallus causes great concern regarding genital adequacy. A concealed penis, although of normal size, appears small either because it is buried in prepubic tissues, enclosed in scrotal tissue penis palmatus (PP), or trapped due to phimosis or a scar following circumcision or trauma. From July 1978 to January 2001 we operated upon 92 boys with concealed penises; 49 had buried penises (BP), while PP of varying degrees was noted in 14. Of 29 patients with a trapped penis, phimosis was noted in 9, post-circumcision cicatrix (PCC) in 17, radical circumcision in 2, and posttraumatic scarring in 1. The BP was corrected at 2–3 years of age by incising the inner prepuce circumferentially, degloving the penis to the penopubic junction, dividing dysgenetic bands, and suturing the dermis of the penopubic skin to Buck's fascia with nonabsorbable sutures. Patients with PP required displacement of the scrotum in addition to correction of the BP. Phimosis was treated by circumcision. Patients with a PCC were recircumcised carefully, preserving normal skin, but Z-plasties and Byars flaps were often required for skin coverage. After radical circumcision and trauma, vascularized flaps were raised to cover the defect. Satisfactory results were obtained in all cases although 2 patients with BP required a second operation. The operation required to correct a concealed penis has to be tailored to its etiology.

Penis Concealed Trapped Webbed Penis palmatus 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jayant Radhakrishnan
    • 1
  • Asim Razzaq
    • 1
  • Kannan Manickam
    • 1
  1. 1.Division of Pediatric Surgery, The University of Illinois, Chicago, IL, USA

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