Climate Dynamics

, Volume 14, Issue 6, pp 385–407 | Cite as

Northern Hemisphere atmospheric blocking as simulated by 15 atmospheric general circulation models in the period 1979–1988

  • F. D’Andrea
  • S. Tibaldi
  • M. Blackburn
  • G. Boer
  • M. Déqué
  • M. R. Dix
  • B. Dugas
  • L. Ferranti
  • T. Iwasaki
  • A. Kitoh
  • V. Pope
  • D. Randall
  • E. Roeckner
  • D. Strauss
  • W. Stern
  • H. Van den Dool
  • D. Williamson

Abstract

 As a part of the Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project (AMIP), the behaviour of 15 general circulation models has been analysed in order to diagnose and compare the ability of the different models in simulating Northern Hemisphere midlatitude atmospheric blocking. In accordance with the established AMIP procedure, the 10-year model integrations were performed using prescribed, time-evolving monthly mean observed SSTs spanning the period January 1979–December 1988. Atmospheric observational data (ECMWF analyses) over the same period have been also used to verify the models results. The models involved in this comparison represent a wide spectrum of model complexity, with different horizontal and vertical resolution, numerical techniques and physical parametrizations, and exhibit large differences in blocking behaviour. Nevertheless, a few common features can be found, such as the general tendency to underestimate both blocking frequency and the average duration of blocks. The problem of the possible relationship between model blocking and model systematic errors has also been assessed, although without resorting to ad-hoc numerical experimentation it is impossible to relate with certainty particular model deficiencies in representing blocking to precise parts of the model formulation.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • F. D’Andrea
    • 1
  • S. Tibaldi
    • 1
  • M. Blackburn
    • 2
  • G. Boer
    • 3
  • M. Déqué
    • 4
  • M. R. Dix
    • 5
  • B. Dugas
    • 6
  • L. Ferranti
    • 7
  • T. Iwasaki
    • 8
  • A. Kitoh
    • 9
  • V. Pope
    • 10
  • D. Randall
    • 11
  • E. Roeckner
    • 12
  • D. Strauss
    • 13
  • W. Stern
    • 14
  • H. Van den Dool
    • 15
  • D. Williamson
    • 16
  1. 1.Atmospheric Dynamics Group, Department of Physics, University of Bologna, ItalyIT
  2. 2.Department of Meteorology, University of Reading, UKGB
  3. 3.Canadian Centre for Climate Research, Victoria, CanadaCA
  4. 4.Centre National de Recherches Météorologiques, Toulouse, FranceFR
  5. 5.Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization, Mordialloc, AustraliaAU
  6. 6.Recherhe en Prévision Numérique, Dorval, CanadaCA
  7. 7.European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts, Reading, UKGB
  8. 8.Numerical Prediction Division, Japan Meteorological Agency, Tokyo, JapanJP
  9. 9.Meteorological Research Institute, Tsukuba, JapanJP
  10. 10.Hadley Centre for Climate Prediction and Research, UK Meteorological Office, Bracknell, UKGB
  11. 11.Department of Atmospheric Science, Colorado State University, USAUS
  12. 12.Max-Plank-Institut für Meteorologie, Hamburg, GermanyDE
  13. 13.Center for Ocean-Land-Atmosphere Studies, Calverton, MD, USAUS
  14. 14.Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory/NOAA, Princeton University, USAUS
  15. 15.National Meteorological Center, Washington DC, USAUS
  16. 16.National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder , CO, USAUS

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