Climate Dynamics

, Volume 37, Issue 11–12, pp 2373–2387

Centennial-scale climate change from decadally-paced explosive volcanism: a coupled sea ice-ocean mechanism

  • Y. Zhong
  • G. H. Miller
  • B. L. Otto-Bliesner
  • M. M. Holland
  • D. A. Bailey
  • D. P. Schneider
  • A. Geirsdottir
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s00382-010-0967-z

Cite this article as:
Zhong, Y., Miller, G.H., Otto-Bliesner, B.L. et al. Clim Dyn (2011) 37: 2373. doi:10.1007/s00382-010-0967-z

Abstract

Northern Hemisphere summer cooling through the Holocene is largely driven by the steady decrease in summer insolation tied to the precession of the equinoxes. However, centennial-scale climate departures, such as the Little Ice Age, must be caused by other forcings, most likely explosive volcanism and changes in solar irradiance. Stratospheric volcanic aerosols have the stronger forcing, but their short residence time likely precludes a lasting climate impact from a single eruption. Decadally paced explosive volcanism may produce a greater climate impact because the long response time of ocean surface waters allows for a cumulative decrease in sea-surface temperatures that exceeds that of any single eruption. Here we use a global climate model to evaluate the potential long-term climate impacts from four decadally paced large tropical eruptions. Direct forcing results in a rapid expansion of Arctic Ocean sea ice that persists throughout the eruption period. The expanded sea ice increases the flux of sea ice exported to the northern North Atlantic long enough that it reduces the convective warming of surface waters in the subpolar North Atlantic. In two of our four simulations the cooler surface waters being advected into the Arctic Ocean reduced the rate of basal sea-ice melt in the Atlantic sector of the Arctic Ocean, allowing sea ice to remain in an expanded state for > 100 model years after volcanic aerosols were removed from the stratosphere. In these simulations the coupled sea ice-ocean mechanism maintains the strong positive feedbacks of an expanded Arctic Ocean sea ice cover, allowing the initial cooling related to the direct effect of volcanic aerosols to be perpetuated, potentially resulting in a centennial-scale or longer change of state in Arctic climate. The fact that the sea ice-ocean mechanism was not established in two of our four simulations suggests that a long-term sea ice response to volcanic forcing is sensitive to the stability of the seawater column, wind, and ocean currents in the North Atlantic during the eruptions.

Supplementary material

382_2010_967_MOESM1_ESM.doc (258 kb)
Supplementary material 1 (DOC 258 kb)

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Y. Zhong
    • 1
  • G. H. Miller
    • 1
    • 2
  • B. L. Otto-Bliesner
    • 3
  • M. M. Holland
    • 3
  • D. A. Bailey
    • 3
  • D. P. Schneider
    • 3
    • 4
  • A. Geirsdottir
    • 5
  1. 1.INSTAARUniversity of ColoradoBoulderUSA
  2. 2.Department of Geological SciencesUniversity of ColoradoBoulderUSA
  3. 3.NCARBoulderUSA
  4. 4.CIRESUniversity of ColoradoBoulderUSA
  5. 5.Department of Earth Sciences & Institute of Earth SciencesUniversity of IcelandReykjavikIceland

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