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Bevacizumab for optic pathway glioma with worsening visual field in absence of imaging progression: 2 case reports and literature review

  • Fumiyuki YamasakiEmail author
  • Motoki Takano
  • Ushio Yonezawa
  • Akira Taguchi
  • Manish Kolakshyapati
  • Hideaki Okumichi
  • Yoshiaki Kiuchi
  • Kaoru Kurisu
Case Report

Abstract

Children with optic pathway gliomas (OPGs) frequently suffer from problems of visual function resulting from tumors. Previous reports showed that bevacizumab improved visual function in patients with OPG via tumor response to treatment. In these two case reports, we show that bevacizumab improved visual field without tumor response as seen in imaging. Both, a 10-year-old girl and a 6-year-old boy, had previous history of treatment with platinum-based chemotherapy. They had visual deterioration without tumor progression on MR imaging. Bevacizumab effectively and immediately improved visual field in both patients without imaging response of OPG. We emphasize that bevacizumab should be considered for patients with OPGs having visual deterioration without tumor progression.

Keywords

Optic pathway glioma Bevacizumab Visual field 

Notes

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

All of the authors report that there are no known conflicts of interest associated with this publication concerning the materials and methods used or the finding specified in this paper and report no disclosure.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Fumiyuki Yamasaki
    • 1
    Email author
  • Motoki Takano
    • 1
  • Ushio Yonezawa
    • 1
  • Akira Taguchi
    • 1
  • Manish Kolakshyapati
    • 1
    • 2
  • Hideaki Okumichi
    • 3
  • Yoshiaki Kiuchi
    • 3
  • Kaoru Kurisu
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Neurosurgery, Graduate School of Biomedical and Health SciencesHiroshima UniversityHiroshimaJapan
  2. 2.Department of NeuroscienceB&B HospitalLalitpurNepal
  3. 3.Department of Ophthalmology, Graduate School of Biomedical and Health SciencesHiroshima UniversityHiroshimaJapan

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