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Establishing reproducible predictors of cerebellar mutism syndrome based on pre-operative imaging

  • Heng Zhang
  • Zhiyi Liao
  • Xiaolei Hao
  • Zhe Han
  • Chunde Li
  • Jian Gong
  • Wei Liu
  • Yongji TianEmail author
Original Article

Abstract

Purpose

To establish some explicit, feasible, and reproducible predictors for CMS.

Materials and methods

This study was a retrospective case study. Data were obtained from 82 patients with medulloblastoma at a single center, Beijing Tiantan Hospital. Based on medical records, we created two independent samples: the CMS group comprising 23 patients and the non-CMS group comprising 23 patients. Pre-operative imaging was studied by performing quantitative assessments of specific indicators.

Results

The CMS group showed greater differences in pre-operative imaging data with the non-CMS group. The Aaxi/daxi ratio in pre-operative MR imaging captured in the axial plane was used to quantify the compression of the cerebellum and brainstem, and significant differences were observed between the CMS group and non-CMS group (p = 0.0002). In the sagittal plane, Dsag*dsag was used to quantify the area of the tumor that invaded the brainstem, and significant differences were observed between the two groups (p = 0.0003). In the coronal plane, Acor/dcor was used to quantify the compression of the upper functional brain region, and significant differences were noted between the two groups (p = 0.0219). Additionally, Evans’ index was introduced to quantify the degree of hydrocephalus. The CMS group tended to show an increased Evans’ index (p = 0.0027).

Conclusion

Based on pre-operative imaging data, some reproducible predictors, such as Aaxi/daxi, Dsag*dsag, Acor/dcor, and Evans’ index, were established.

Keywords

Cerebellar mutism syndrome Medulloblastoma Reproducible predictors Brainstem compression Surrounding edema Efferent cerebellar pathway 

Notes

Funding

This study was funded by the Beijing Natural Science Foundation (7172041).

Compliance with ethical standards

Before the investigation, we received the approval of the Ethics Review Committee of the Beijing Tiantan Hospital

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Heng Zhang
    • 1
    • 2
  • Zhiyi Liao
    • 1
    • 2
  • Xiaolei Hao
    • 1
    • 2
  • Zhe Han
    • 1
    • 2
  • Chunde Li
    • 1
    • 2
  • Jian Gong
    • 1
    • 2
  • Wei Liu
    • 1
    • 2
  • Yongji Tian
    • 1
    • 2
    Email author
  1. 1.Department of Pediatric NeurosurgeryBeijing Tiantan Hospital, Capital Medical UniversityBeijingChina
  2. 2.China National Clinical Research Center for Neurological Diseases, Center of Brain Tumor, Beijing Institute for Brain Disorders, Beijing Key Laboratory of Brain TumorBeijingChina

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