Child's Nervous System

, Volume 29, Issue 4, pp 643–649

Calcifications associated with pediatric intracranial arterial aneurysms: incidence and correlation with pathogenetic subtypes

  • K. O’Brien
  • J. Leach
  • B. Jones
  • J. Bissler
  • M. Zuccarello
  • T. Abruzzo
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s00381-012-1985-4

Cite this article as:
O’Brien, K., Leach, J., Jones, B. et al. Childs Nerv Syst (2013) 29: 643. doi:10.1007/s00381-012-1985-4

Abstract

Background and purpose

Little is known about calcifications associated with pediatric intracranial arterial aneurysms (IAA). We sought to characterize calcifications associated with pediatric IAA according to aneurysm pathogenetic subtype.

Materials and methods

Patients with IAA less than 20 years of age were retrospectively identified. Three fellowship-trained neuroradiologists independently reviewed each patient’s CT studies for calcifications of the parent artery or aneurysm. Aneurysmal calcification (ANC) was correlated with characteristics of the patient (age, sex) and aneurysm pathogenetic subtype, size, morphology, rupture status, and location.

Results

Thirty-three patients (mean age 10 years) with 43 IAA were analyzed. There were no parent artery calcifications. Nine IAA were calcified. IAA in children with non-hemodynamic risk factors (arteriopathy, trauma, infection, tumor) were more commonly calcified than idiopathic IAA (p = 0.029). More than one third of the pediatric IAAs in this group (arteriopathy, infection trauma, tumor) were calcified. IAA ≥ 10 mm were more likely to be calcified (p = 0.03). IAA that were ruptured at presentation were less likely to be calcified (p = 0.03). ANC was not significantly associated with patient age (≤10 years vs. >10 years), sex, morphology (fusiform vs. saccular) or location (anterior vs. posterior circulation).

Conclusion

Aneurysmal but not parent artery calcifications are associated with a significant minority of pediatric IAA. Pediatric ANCs are associated with underlying non-hemodynamic vascular risk factors (arteriopathy, infection, trauma, and tumor), size ≥10 mm and non-hemorrhagic presentation.

Keywords

Intracranial aneurysm Cerebral arterial diseases Arteriopathy Calcification 

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • K. O’Brien
    • 1
  • J. Leach
    • 2
  • B. Jones
    • 2
  • J. Bissler
    • 2
  • M. Zuccarello
    • 3
  • T. Abruzzo
    • 2
  1. 1.University of Cincinnati College of MedicineCincinnatiUSA
  2. 2.Pediatric Interventional NeuroradiologyCincinnati Children’s Hospital and Medical CenterCincinnatiUSA
  3. 3.University Hospital CincinnatiCincinnatiUSA

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