Child's Nervous System

, Volume 22, Issue 2, pp 172–175

Malignant meningioma as a second malignancy after therapy for acute lymphatic leukemia without cranial radiation

  • J. P. Regel
  • B. Schoch
  • I. E. Sandalcioglu
  • R. Wieland
  • C. Westermeier
  • D. Stolke
  • H. Wiedemayer
Case Report

Abstract

Rationale

Meningiomas in the pediatric age group are very rare tumors, comprising about 1–4.2% of all primary pediatric intracranial tumors.

Case report

We present a 17-year-old patient who suffered from an intraventricular malignant meningioma. At the age of 2 years, acute lymphatic leukemia (common ALL [cALL]) was diagnosed and successfully treated with chemotherapy. There was no cranial radiation therapy.

In December 2001, 13 years after diagnosis of cALL, he complained of headache, vomiting, and walking difficulties. Magnetic resonance imaging showed an enhancing mass with cystic components in the trigone of the right lateral ventricle. The tumor was removed completely. Histological diagnosis revealed a malignant papillary meningioma. After removal of a recurrent meningioma 16 months later, he received local radiotherapy.

Conclusion

Pathogenetic mechanisms, treatment options, and prognosis of meningiomas and secondary malignancies of this age group are discussed.

Keywords

Malignant meningioma Acute lymphatic leukemia Secondary malignancy 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. P. Regel
    • 1
  • B. Schoch
    • 1
  • I. E. Sandalcioglu
    • 1
  • R. Wieland
    • 2
  • C. Westermeier
    • 1
  • D. Stolke
    • 1
  • H. Wiedemayer
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of NeurosurgeryUniversity Medical School EssenEssenGermany
  2. 2.Department of Pediatric Hematology and OncologyUniversity Medical School EssenEssenGermany

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