Geo-Marine Letters

, Volume 29, Issue 5, pp 301–308 | Cite as

Enrichment of adsorbed methane in authigenic carbonate concretions of the Japan Trench

  • Akira Ijiri
  • Urumu Tsunogai
  • Toshitaka Gamo
  • Fumiko Nakagawa
  • Tatsuhiko Sakamoto
  • Saneatsu Saito
Original

Abstract

Substantial amounts of adsorbed methane were detected in authigenic carbonate concretions recovered from sedimentary layers from depths between 245 and 1,108 m below seafloor during Ocean Drilling Program Leg 186 to ODP sites 1150 and 1151 on the deep-sea terrace of the Japan Trench. Methane contents were almost two orders of magnitude higher in the concretions (291–4,528 nmol/g wet wt) than in the surrounding bulk sediments (5–93 nmol/g wet wt), whereas methane/ethane ratios and stable carbon isotopic compositions were very similar. Carbonate content of surrounding bulk sediments (0.02–3.2 wet wt%) and methane content of the surrounding bulk sediments correlated positively. Extrapolation of the carbonate contents of bulk sediments suggests that 100 wt% carbonate would correspond to 1,886±732 nmol methane per g bulk sediment, which is similar to the average value observed in the carbonate concretions (1,321±1,067 nmol/g wet wt, n = 13). These data support the hypothesis that, in sediments, adsorbed hydrocarbon gases are strongly associated with authigenic carbonates.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Akira Ijiri
    • 1
    • 4
  • Urumu Tsunogai
    • 1
  • Toshitaka Gamo
    • 1
    • 2
  • Fumiko Nakagawa
    • 1
  • Tatsuhiko Sakamoto
    • 3
  • Saneatsu Saito
    • 3
  1. 1.Division of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Graduate School of ScienceHokkaido UniversitySapporoJapan
  2. 2.Ocean Research InstituteUniversity of TokyoTokyoJapan
  3. 3.Institute for Research on Earth EvolutionJapan Marine Science and Technology CenterYokosukaJapan
  4. 4.Institute for Research on Earth EvolutionJapan Marine Science and Technology CenterYokosukaJapan

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