Statistical Papers

, Volume 49, Issue 2, pp 201–209

Normal and logistic random variables: distribution of the linear combination

Regular Article

Abstract

The exact distribution of the linear combination α X  +  β Y is derived when X and Y are normal and logistic random variables distributed independently of each other. Tabulations of the associated percentage points are given along with a computer program to generate them. This work is motivated by problems in reliability engineering.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Mathematics and StatisticsBowling Green State UniversityBowling GreenUSA
  2. 2.School of MathematicsUniversity of ManchesterManchesterUK

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