Journal of Comparative Physiology A

, Volume 197, Issue 5, pp 571–583

Duration tuning in the auditory midbrain of echolocating and non-echolocating vertebrates

Review

DOI: 10.1007/s00359-011-0627-8

Cite this article as:
Sayegh, R., Aubie, B. & Faure, P.A. J Comp Physiol A (2011) 197: 571. doi:10.1007/s00359-011-0627-8

Abstract

Neurons tuned for stimulus duration were first discovered in the auditory midbrain of frogs. Duration-tuned neurons (DTNs) have since been reported from the central auditory system of both echolocating and non-echolocating mammals, and from the central visual system of cats. We hypothesize that the functional significance of auditory duration tuning likely varies between species with different evolutionary histories, sensory ecologies, and bioacoustic constraints. For example, in non-echolocating animals such as frogs and mice the temporal filtering properties of auditory DTNs may function to discriminate species-specific communication sounds. In echolocating bats duration tuning may also be used to create cells with highly selective responses for specific rates of frequency modulation and/or pulse-echo delays. The ability to echolocate appears to have selected for high temporal acuity in the duration tuning curves of inferior colliculus neurons in bats. Our understanding of the neural mechanisms underlying sound duration selectivity has improved substantially since DTNs were first discovered almost 50 years ago, but additional research is required for a comprehensive understanding of the functional role and the behavioral significance that duration tuning plays in sensory systems.

Keywords

Audition Duration selectivity Echolocation Neurophysiology Temporal processing 

Abbreviations

AC

Auditory cortex

CF

Constant frequency

CNS

Central nervous system

DTN

Duration-tuned neuron

FM

Frequency modulation

IC

Inferior colliculus

MGB

Medial geniculate body

OFFE

Offset-evoked excitation

ONE

Onset-evoked excitation

PT

Pure tone

SPL

Sound pressure level

SUSI

Sustained onset-evoked inhibition

TS

Torus semicircularis

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Psychology, Neuroscience & BehaviourMcMaster UniversityHamiltonCanada

Personalised recommendations