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Experiments in Fluids

, 47:1025 | Cite as

Extension and characterization of pressure-sensitive molecular film

  • Yu Matsuda
  • Hideo Mori
  • Yoshiki Sakazaki
  • Toru Uchida
  • Suguru Suzuki
  • Hiroki Yamaguchi
  • Tomohide Niimi
Research Article

Abstract

Pressure-sensitive paint (PSP) has the potential as a diagnostic tool for pressure measurement in high Knudsen number regime because it works as a so-called “molecular sensor”. However, there are few reports concerning application of PSP to micro-devices, because conventional PSPs are too thick owing to polymer binders. In our previous work, we adopted the Langmuir–Blodgett (LB) technique to fabricate the pressure-sensitive molecular film (PSMF) using Pd(II) Mesoporphyrin IX (PdMP), which has pressure sensitivity only in the low pressure range (below 130 Pa). In this study, aiming for pressure measurement under an atmospheric pressure condition, we have constructed four samples of PSMFs composed of Pt(II) Mesoporphyrin IX (PtMP), Pt(II) Mesoporphyrin IX dimethylester (PtMPDME), Pt(II) Protoporphyrin IX (PtPP) and Cu(II) Mesoporphyrin IX dimethylester (CuMPDME) as luminescent molecules. The pressure sensitivity of those PSMFs was measured, and it was clarified that the pressure sensitivity of PSMF-PtMP is the highest among the four samples. Moreover, the temperature dependency of PSMF-PtMP was investigated, and we found that the temperature dependency of PSMF is dominated not by the oxygen diffusion in the layer, but by non-radiative deactivation process of excited luminescent molecules.

Keywords

Luminescent Intensity Pressure Sensitivity Oxygen Quenching Volmer Plot Langmuir Adsorption Model 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgments

The present work was supported by a grant-in-aid for Scientific Research of the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology. The authors would like to express our gratitude to Prof. Tokuji Miyashita and Prof. Masaya Mitsuishi of the Tohoku University and Prof. Takahiro Seki of the Nagoya University for their helpful advice about the LB film technique.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yu Matsuda
    • 1
  • Hideo Mori
    • 2
  • Yoshiki Sakazaki
    • 1
  • Toru Uchida
    • 1
  • Suguru Suzuki
    • 1
  • Hiroki Yamaguchi
    • 1
  • Tomohide Niimi
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Micro-Nano Systems EngineeringNagoya UniversityNagoyaJapan
  2. 2.Department of Mechanical Engineering (Fluids)Kyushu UniversityFukuokaJapan

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