Experiments in Fluids

, Volume 37, Issue 5, pp 745–762 | Cite as

Macroscopic and microscopic characteristics of a fuel spray impinged on the wall

Original

Abstract

An experimental study was performed to investigate the macroscopic behavior and atomization characteristics of a high-speed diesel spray impinged on the wall at various injection and impinging conditions. The development processes of sprays impinged on the wall were visualized using the spray visualization system composed of a Nd:YAG laser and an intensified charge-coupled device (ICCD) camera. The atomization characteristics of the impinged spray on the wall were also explored in terms of mean droplet diameter and velocity distributions by using a phase Doppler particle analyzer (PDPA) system. The results provide the effects of injection parameters, wall conditions, and the other various experimental conditions on the macroscopic behavior and atomization characteristics of the impinged sprays on the wall.

Notes

Acknowledgement

This work was supported by the Korea Research Foundation, grant no. KRF-2003-042-D20025.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Mechanical EngineeringHanyang UniversitySeoulKorea

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