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Experiments in Fluids

, Volume 36, Issue 1, pp 3–10 | Cite as

Instantaneous, three-component planar Doppler velocimetry using imaging fibre bundles

  • D. S. Nobes
  • H. D. Ford
  • R. P. Tatam
Article

Abstract

This paper describes a planar Doppler velocimetry (PDV) technique that is capable of measuring the three, instantaneous and time average components of velocity over two spatial dimensions using a single pair of signal and reference cameras. The three views required to obtain three-component velocity information are guided from the collection optics to a single imaging plane using flexible fibre imaging bundles. These are made up of a coherent array of single fibres and are combined at one end as the input plane to the measurement head. Measurements of the velocity field of a rotating disk are used in the development of the technique and initial results of the instantaneous velocity field of a jet are presented.

Keywords

Reference Image Laser Frequency Scattered Signal Laser Speckle Instantaneous Velocity Field 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgements

The work was funded by Engineering and Physical Research Sciences (EPSRC) UK, and The Royal Society (UK).

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Optical Sensors Group, School of EngineeringCranfield UniversityCranfieldUK

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