World Journal of Urology

, Volume 26, Issue 3, pp 257–262 | Cite as

Initial clinical experience with full-length metal ureteral stents for obstructive ureteral stenosis

  • Udo Nagele
  • Markus A. Kuczyk
  • Marcus Horstmann
  • Jörg Hennenlotter
  • Karl-Dietrich Sievert
  • David Schilling
  • Ute Walcher
  • Arnulf Stenzl
  • Aristotelis G. Anastasiadis
Original Article

Abstract

Objectives

Long-term ureteral stenting is used to ensure urinary drainage if a reconstructive approach or a release of an extrinsic obstruction is not possible. In this contribution, a long-term experience with a new full-length, metal indwelling stent is presented.

Methods

Fourteen patients with ureteral obstruction received full metal indwelling stents in 18 collecting systems (benign disease in 5 and malignant disease in 13). Stent placement was performed cystoscopically under fluoroscopic guidance. Follow-up was done every 3 months with ultrasonographic examination, creatinine levels, and a visual analog pain score.

Results

Eight stents were removed, whereas eight are still in situ. One patient without stent-related problems died because of progressive rectal cancer 9 months after bilateral stent insertion. Mean stent duration (8 stents still in situ) is 8.6 months, whereas mean stent duration for benign and malignant disease is 11.8 (median 13) and 7.3 (median 6) months, respectively (p < 0.05). All removed stents were extracted endoscopically without any problems and had no incrustation except two. Neither migration nor mechanical damage was observed.

Conclusion

This novel stent is easy to insert and remove. It is an option for patients in which a surgical reconstruction of the obstructed ureter is not possible. Stents have been developed further and are now available in various lengths. This might result in a reduction of problems associated with inadequate stent length and should increase patient comfort and stent durability.

Keywords

Ureteral obstruction Endourology Metal stent 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Udo Nagele
    • 1
  • Markus A. Kuczyk
    • 1
  • Marcus Horstmann
    • 1
  • Jörg Hennenlotter
    • 1
  • Karl-Dietrich Sievert
    • 1
  • David Schilling
    • 1
  • Ute Walcher
    • 1
  • Arnulf Stenzl
    • 1
  • Aristotelis G. Anastasiadis
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of UrologyUniversity of TuebingenTuebingenGermany

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