World Journal of Urology

, Volume 23, Issue 4, pp 253–256 | Cite as

Progression delay in men with mild symptoms of bladder outlet obstruction: a comparative study of phytotherapy and watchful waiting

  • Bob Djavan
  • Yan Kit Fong
  • Aziz Chaudry
  • Andreas Reissigl
  • Theodore Anagnostou
  • Fariborz Bagheri
  • Matthias Waldert
  • Sibylle Marihart
  • Mike Harik
  • Michael Marberger
Original Article

Abstract

To determine the effect of phytotherapy (Serona repens) on the clinical progression in men with mild symptoms of bladder outlet obstruction (BOO). A total of 189 patients with mild symptoms of BOO, recruited from four different European clinics, were included in the analysis. Age, prostate specific antigen (PSA), international prostate symptom score (IPSS), quality of life (QOL), maximum urinary flow rate (Qmax) and total prostate and transitional zone volume were recorded. Clinical progression was defined as change from the mild-IPSS group into the moderate or severe group or the occurrence of urinary retention and need of surgery. Cumulative progression rate was 1, 7, 9 and 16% at 6, 12, 18 and 24 month, respectively, for the active group (Serona repens) as compared to 6, 13, 15 and 24% for the watchful waiting group. (P=0.03) significant improvements in the Qmax, IPSS and QOL were seen in the group receiving Serona repens. Serona repens significantly reduced the clinical progression rates in men with mild symptoms of BOO. It also led to improvements in urinary symptoms, QOL scores and urinary flow rates.

Keywords

Benign prostatic hyperplasia Progression Serona repens Watchful waiting Placebo 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Bob Djavan
    • 1
  • Yan Kit Fong
    • 1
  • Aziz Chaudry
    • 2
  • Andreas Reissigl
    • 3
  • Theodore Anagnostou
    • 1
  • Fariborz Bagheri
    • 4
  • Matthias Waldert
    • 1
  • Sibylle Marihart
    • 1
  • Mike Harik
    • 1
  • Michael Marberger
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of UrologyUniversity of ViennaWienAustria
  2. 2.Department of UrologySt Thomas HospitalLondonUK
  3. 3.Department of UrologyLKH BregenzBregenzAustria
  4. 4.Department of UrologyUnversity PeczBudaphestHungary

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