Applied Physics B

, Volume 88, Issue 4, pp 493–497

Vertical integration of ultrafast semiconductor lasers

  • D.J.H.C. Maas
  • A.-R. Bellancourt
  • B. Rudin
  • M. Golling
  • H.J. Unold
  • T. Südmeyer
  • U. Keller
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DOI: 10.1007/s00340-007-2760-1

Cite this article as:
Maas, D., Bellancourt, AR., Rudin, B. et al. Appl. Phys. B (2007) 88: 493. doi:10.1007/s00340-007-2760-1

Abstract

Lasers generating short pulses – referred to as ultrafast lasers – enable many applications in science and technology. Numerous laboratory experiments have confirmed that ultrafast lasers can significantly increase telecommunication data rates [1], improve computer interconnects, and optically clock microprocessors [2, 3]. New applications in metrology [4], supercontinuum generation [5], and life sciences with two-photon microscopy [6] only work with ultrashort pulses but have relied on bulky and complex ultrafast solid-state lasers. Semiconductor lasers are ideally suited for mass production and widespread applications, because they are based on a wafer-scale technology with a high level of integration. Not surprisingly, the first lasers entering virtually every household were semiconductor lasers in compact disk players. Here we introduce a new concept and make the first feasibility demonstration of a new class of ultrafast semiconductor lasers which are power scalable, support both optical and electrical pumping and allow for wafer-scale fabrication. The laser beam propagates vertically (perpendicularly) through the epitaxial layer structure which has both gain and absorber layers integrated. In contrast to edge-emitters, these lasers have semiconductor layers that can be optimized separately by using different growth parameters and with no regrowth. This is especially important to integrate the gain and absorber layers, which require different quantum confinement. A saturable absorber is required for pulse generation and we optimized its parameters with a single self-assembled InAs quantum dot layer at low growth temperatures. We refer to this class of devices as modelocked integrated external-cavity surface emitting lasers (MIXSEL). Vertical integration supports a diffraction-limited circular output beam, transform-limited pulses, lower timing jitter, and synchronization to an external electronic clock. The pulse repetition rate scales from 1-GHz to 100-GHz by simply changing the laser cavity length. This result holds promise for semiconductor-based high-volume wafer-scale fabrication of compact, ultrafast lasers.

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • D.J.H.C. Maas
    • 1
  • A.-R. Bellancourt
    • 1
  • B. Rudin
    • 1
  • M. Golling
    • 1
  • H.J. Unold
    • 1
  • T. Südmeyer
    • 1
  • U. Keller
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Physics, Institute of Quantum ElectronicsETH ZurichZurichSwitzerland

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