Applied Physics B

, Volume 79, Issue 6, pp 793–797

Optothermal transient emission radiometry for studying the changes in epidermal hydration induced during ripening of tomato fruit mutants

  • X. Guo
  • D. Bicanic
  • R. Imhof
  • P. Xiao
  • J. Harbinson
Article

Abstract

Optothermal transient emission radiometry (OTTER) was used to determine the mean surface hydration and the hydration profile of three mutants (beefsteak, slicing and salad) of harvested tomatoes (Lycopersicon esculentum) that were kept under ambient conditions for as long as 51 days. Maximal sensitivity of OTTER to water in the samples was achieved by using 2.94 μm and 13.1 μm as excitation and emission wavelengths, respectively. The surface hydration increases rapidly and reaches a constant level during the remaining period. The hydrolysis of pectic substances that occur in tomatoes while ripening might be a possible cause for the observed change in hydration.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • X. Guo
    • 1
  • D. Bicanic
    • 2
    • 3
  • R. Imhof
    • 1
  • P. Xiao
    • 1
  • J. Harbinson
    • 4
  1. 1.School of EEIESouth Bank UniversityLondonUK
  2. 2.Laser Laboratory for Photothermal Science, Department of Agrotechnology and Food Sciences, Biophysics DivisionWageningen University and Research CentreWageningenThe Netherlands
  3. 3.Department of Human Nutrition and Food Chemistry, Faculty of Biotechnology and Food TechnologyZagreb UniversityZagrebCroatia
  4. 4.Horticultural Production Chain Division, Department of Plant SciencesWageningen University and Research CentreWageningenThe Netherlands

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