Coral Reefs

, Volume 33, Issue 2, pp 431–440

Can benthic algae mediate larval behavior and settlement of the coral Acropora muricata?

  • V. Denis
  • M. Loubeyres
  • S. S. Doo
  • S. de Palmas
  • S. Keshavmurthy
  • H. J. Hsieh
  • C. A. Chen
Report

DOI: 10.1007/s00338-014-1127-4

Cite this article as:
Denis, V., Loubeyres, M., Doo, S.S. et al. Coral Reefs (2014) 33: 431. doi:10.1007/s00338-014-1127-4

Abstract

The resilience of coral reefs relies significantly on the ability of corals to recover successfully in algal-dominated environments. Larval settlement is a critical but highly vulnerable stage in the early life history of corals. In this study, we analyzed how the presence of two upright fleshy algae, Sargassum mcclurei (SM) and Padina australis (PA), and one crustose coralline algae, Mesophyllum simulans (MS), affects the settlement of Acropora muricata larvae. Coral larvae were exposed to seawater flowing over these algae at two concentrations. Larval settlement and mortality were assessed daily through four variables related to their behavior: swimming, substratum testing, metamorphosis, and stresses. Temperature, dissolved oxygen, pH, algal growth, and photosynthetic efficiency were monitored throughout the experiment. Results showed that A. muricata larvae can settle successfully in the absence of external stimuli (63 ± 6 % of the larvae settled in control treatments). While algae such as MS may stimulate substrate testing and settlement of larvae in the first day after competency, they ultimately had a lower settlement rate than controls. Fleshy algae such as PA, and in a lesser measure SM, induced more metamorphosis than controls and seemed to eventually stimulate settlement. A diverse combination of signals and/or modifications of microenvironments by algae and their associated microbial communities may explain the pattern observed in coral settlement. Overall, this study contributes significantly to the knowledge of the interaction between coral and algae, which is critical for the resilience of the reefs.

Keywords

Mesophyllum Padina Sargassum Coral larvae Coral–algal interactions Reef recovery 

Supplementary material

338_2014_1127_MOESM1_ESM.eps (982 kb)
Supplementary material Figure S1. Light conditions around experimental tanks. Gray numbers indicate irradiance (μmol photons m-2) measured using a quantum sensor (LI193SA, LICOR) on two sides of the tanks. Difference among treatments was tested using a nonparametric Kruskal–Wallis test. CO: control, PA: Padina australis, SM: Sargassummcclurei, MS: Mesophyllum simulans. 1 and 4 represent 1 g and 4 g treatments, respectively (EPS 982 kb)

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • V. Denis
    • 1
  • M. Loubeyres
    • 1
  • S. S. Doo
    • 1
    • 5
  • S. de Palmas
    • 1
  • S. Keshavmurthy
    • 1
  • H. J. Hsieh
    • 2
  • C. A. Chen
    • 1
    • 3
    • 4
  1. 1.Biodiversity Research CenterAcademia SinicaNangang, TaipeiTaiwan
  2. 2.Penghu Marine Biological Research CenterMakongTaiwan
  3. 3.Taiwan International Graduate Program-BiodiversityAcademia SinicaNangang, TaipeiTaiwan
  4. 4.Institute of OceanographyNational Taiwan UniversityTaipeiTaiwan
  5. 5.School of Biological SciencesUniversity of SydneySydneyAustralia

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