Coral Reefs

, Volume 32, Issue 1, pp 121–125

Fiji’s largest marine reserve benefits reef sharks

Note

DOI: 10.1007/s00338-012-0970-4

Cite this article as:
Goetze, J.S. & Fullwood, L.A.F. Coral Reefs (2013) 32: 121. doi:10.1007/s00338-012-0970-4

Abstract

To provide more information about whether sharks benefit from no-take marine reserves, we quantified the relative abundance and biomass of reef sharks inside and outside of Namena, Fiji’s largest reserve (60.6 km2). Using stereo baited remote underwater video systems (stereo-BRUVs), we found that the abundance and biomass of sharks was approximately two and four times greater in shallow and deep locations, respectively, within the Namena reserve compared to adjacent fished areas. The greater abundance and biomass of reef sharks inside Namena is likely a result of greater prey availability rather than protection from fishing. This study demonstrates that marine reserves can benefit sharks.

Keywords

Baited video Marine reserve Relative abundance Biomass Reef sharks Fiji 

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.The UWA Oceans Institute and School of Plant Biology (M090), Faculty of Natural and Agricultural ScienceThe University of Western AustraliaCrawleyAustralia

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