Coral Reefs

, Volume 27, Issue 3, pp 485–490 | Cite as

Effect of aragonite saturation state on settlement and post-settlement growth of Porites astreoides larvae

Note

Abstract

In response to the increases in pCO2 projected in the 21st century, adult coral growth and calcification are expected to decrease significantly. However, no published studies have investigated the effect of elevated pCO2 on earlier life history stages of corals. Porites astreoides larvae were collected from reefs in Key Largo, Florida, USA, settled and reared in controlled saturation state seawater. Three saturation states were obtained, using 1 M HCl additions, corresponding to present (380 ppm) and projected pCO2 scenarios for the years 2065 (560 ppm) and 2100 (720 ppm). The effect of saturation state on settlement and post-settlement growth was evaluated. Saturation state had no significant effect on percent settlement; however, skeletal extension rate was positively correlated with saturation state, with ~50% and 78% reductions in growth at the mid and high pCO2 treatments compared to controls, respectively.

Keywords

Coral Aragonite saturation Larvae Climate change Ocean acidification Growth 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Division of Marine Biology and FisheriesRosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric ScienceMiamiUSA

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