Coral Reefs

, Volume 25, Issue 4, pp 609–615

Symbiotic crabs maintain coral health by clearing sediments

  • Hannah L. Stewart
  • Sally J. Holbrook
  • Russell J. Schmitt
  • Andrew J. Brooks
Report

Abstract

Stony corals are the foundation of coral reef ecosystems and form associations with other reef species. Many of these associations may be ecologically important and play a role in maintaining the health and diversity of reef systems, rendering it critical to understand the influence of symbiotic organisms in mediating responses to perturbation. This study demonstrates the importance of an association with trapeziid crabs in reducing adverse effects of sediments deposited on corals. In a field experiment, mortality rates of two species of branching corals were significantly lowered by the presence of crabs. All outplanted corals with crabs survived whereas 45–80% of corals without crabs died within a month. For surviving corals that lacked crabs, growth was slower and tissue bleaching and sediment load were higher. Laboratory experiments revealed that corals with crabs shed substantially more of the sediments deposited on coral surfaces, but also that crabs were most effective at removing grain sizes that were most damaging to coral tissues. The mechanism underlying this symbiotic relationship has not been recognized previously, and its role in maintaining coral health is likely to become even more critical as reefs worldwide experience increasing sedimentation.

Keywords

Crabs Corals Sediment Trapeziid Coral bleaching Symbiosis 

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hannah L. Stewart
    • 1
  • Sally J. Holbrook
    • 1
    • 2
  • Russell J. Schmitt
    • 1
    • 2
  • Andrew J. Brooks
    • 1
  1. 1.Coastal Research Center, Marine Science InstituteUniversity of California Santa BarbaraSanta BarbaraUSA
  2. 2.Department of Ecology, Evolution and Marine BiologyUniversity of California Santa BarbaraSanta BarbaraUSA

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