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Mammalian Genome

, Volume 9, Issue 1, pp 15–19 | Cite as

A new inbred strain JF1 established from Japanese fancy mouse carrying the classic piebald allele

  • Tsuyoshi Koide
  • Kazuo Moriwaki
  • Kikue Uchida
  • Akihiko Mita
  • Tomoko Sagai
  • Hiromichi Yonekawa
  • Hideki Katoh
  • Nobumoto Miyashita
  • Kimiyuk Tsuchiya
  • Toennes J. Nielsen
  • Toshihiko Shiroishi
Original Contributions

Abstract

A new inbred strain JF1 (Japanese Fancy Mouse 1) was established from a strain of fancy mouse. Morphological and genetical analysis indicated that the mouse originated from the Japanese wild mouse, Mus musculus molossinus. JF1 has characteristic coat color, black spots on the white coat, with black eyes. The mutation appeared to be linked to an old mutation piebald (s). Characterization of the causative gene for piebald, endothelin receptor type B (ednrb), demonstrated that the allele in JF1 is same as that of classic piebald allele, suggesting an identical origin of these two mutants. Possibly, classic piebald mutation was introduced from the Japanese tame mouse, which was already reported at the end of the 1700s. We showed that JF1 is a useful strain for mapping of mutant genes on laboratory strains owing to a high level of polymorphisms in microsatellite markers between JF1 and laboratory strains. The clarified genotypes of JF1 for coat color are “aa BB CC DD ss”.

Keywords

Microsatellite Marker Inbred Strain Coat Color Laboratory Mouse White Coat 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Tsuyoshi Koide
    • 1
  • Kazuo Moriwaki
    • 2
  • Kikue Uchida
    • 1
  • Akihiko Mita
    • 1
  • Tomoko Sagai
    • 1
  • Hiromichi Yonekawa
    • 3
  • Hideki Katoh
    • 4
  • Nobumoto Miyashita
    • 5
  • Kimiyuk Tsuchiya
    • 6
  • Toennes J. Nielsen
    • 7
  • Toshihiko Shiroishi
    • 1
  1. 1.Mammalian Genetics LaboratoryNational Institute of GeneticsMishimaJapan
  2. 2.The Graduate University for Advanced Studies HayamaKanagawa-kenJapan
  3. 3.Department of Laboratory Animal ScienceThe Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical Science HonkomagomeTokyoJapan
  4. 4.Central Institute for Experimental AnimalsMiyamae-kuJapan
  5. 5.Experimental Animal CenterKagawa Medical University Miki-choKagawa-kenJapan
  6. 6.Experimental Animal CenterMiyazaki Medical CollegeKiyotakeJapan
  7. 7.University of AarhusAarhus CDenmark

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