Mammalian Genome

, Volume 24, Issue 1–2, pp 72–79 | Cite as

Comparison of the longissimus muscle proteome between obese and lean pigs at 180 days

  • Anning Li
  • Delin Mo
  • Xiao Zhao
  • Wei Jiang
  • Peiqing Cong
  • Zuyong He
  • Shuqi Xiao
  • Xiaohong Liu
  • Yaosheng Chen
Article

Abstract

Production of high-quality meat is important to satisfy the consumer and make the pig industry competitive. Obese and lean breeds of pig show clear differences in adipogenic capacity and meat quality, but the underlying molecular mechanism remains unclear. We have compared protein expression of the longissimus muscle between Lantang (LT, obese) and Landrace (LR, lean) pigs at the age of 180 days using two-dimensional fluorescence difference gel electrophoresis. Of the 1,400 protein spots detected per gel, 18 were differentially expressed between the two breeds. Using peptide mass fingerprint and tandem mass spectrometry, 17 protein spots were identified, corresponding to ten different proteins that could be divided into four groups: metabolism-related, structure-related, stress-related, and other (unclassified). Among the metabolism-related proteins, COX5A and ATP5B, which participate in oxidative phosphorylation, were highly expressed in LT, whereas ENO3, which is involved in glycolysis, was highly expressed in LR. These results may contribute valuable information to our understanding of the molecular mechanism responsible for differences between obese and lean pigs, such as growth rate and meat quality.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Anning Li
    • 1
  • Delin Mo
    • 1
  • Xiao Zhao
    • 1
  • Wei Jiang
    • 1
  • Peiqing Cong
    • 1
  • Zuyong He
    • 1
  • Shuqi Xiao
    • 1
  • Xiaohong Liu
    • 1
  • Yaosheng Chen
    • 1
  1. 1.State Key Laboratory of Biocontrol, School of Life ScienceSun Yat-Sen UniversityGuangzhouPeople’s Republic of China

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