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Mammalian Genome

, Volume 20, Issue 1, pp 14–20 | Cite as

Establishment of germline-competent embryonic stem cell lines from the MSM/Ms strain

  • Kimi Araki
  • Naoki Takeda
  • Atsushi Yoshiki
  • Yuichi Obata
  • Naomi Nakagata
  • Toshihiko Shiroishi
  • Kazuo Moriwaki
  • Ken-ichi YamamuraEmail author
Article

Abstract

MSM/Ms is an inbred mouse strain established from the Japanese wild mouse, Mus musculus molossinus, which has been phylogenetically distinct from common laboratory mouse strains for about 1 million years. The nucleotide substitution rate between MSM/Ms and C57BL/6 is estimated to be 0.96%. MSM/Ms mice display unique characteristics not observed in the commonly used laboratory strains, including an extremely low incidence of tumor development, high locomotor activity, and resistance to high-fat-diet-induced diabetes. Thus, functional genomic analyses using MSM/Ms should provide a powerful tool for the identification of novel phenotypes and gene functions. We report here the derivation of germline-competent embryonic stem (ES) cell lines from MSM/Ms blastocysts, allowing genetic manipulation of the M. m. molossinus genome. Fifteen blastocysts were cultured in ES cell medium and three ES lines, Mol/MSM-1, -2, and -3, were established. They were tested for germline competency by aggregation with ICR morulae and germline chimeras were obtained from all three lines. We also injected Mol/MSM-1 ES cells into blastocysts of ICR or C57BL/6 × BDF1 mice and found that blastocyst injection resulted in a higher production rate of chimeric mice than did aggregation. Furthermore, Mol/MSM-1 subclones electroporated with a gene trap vector were also highly efficient at producing germline chimeras using C57BL/6 × BDF1 blastocyst injection. This Mol/MSM-1 ES line should provide an excellent new tool allowing the genetic manipulation of the MSM/Ms genome.

Keywords

Embryonic Stem Embryonic Stem Cell Bacterial Artificial Chromosome Embryonic Stem Cell Line Chimeric Mouse 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgments

This work was supported by KAKENHI (A) (17200028) and (B) (19300149) from the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS). The MSM/Ms mouse strain (RBRC00209) was provided by RIKEN BRC, which is a participant in the National Bio-Resource Project of the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT), Japan. We thank Dr. M. Muta, Ms. Y. Tsuruta, and K. Haruna for their technical assistance, and the Center for Animal Resources and Development for the care of the animals used in this study.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kimi Araki
    • 1
  • Naoki Takeda
    • 2
  • Atsushi Yoshiki
    • 3
  • Yuichi Obata
    • 3
  • Naomi Nakagata
    • 2
  • Toshihiko Shiroishi
    • 4
  • Kazuo Moriwaki
    • 3
  • Ken-ichi Yamamura
    • 1
    Email author
  1. 1.Department of Developmental Genetics, Institute of Molecular Embryology and GeneticsKumamoto UniversityKumamotoJapan
  2. 2.Institute of Resource Development and AnalysisKumamoto UniversityKumamotoJapan
  3. 3.Riken Bioresource CenterTsukuba-shiJapan
  4. 4.National Institute of GeneticsMishimaJapan

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