Mammalian Genome

, Volume 20, Issue 1, pp 14–20

Establishment of germline-competent embryonic stem cell lines from the MSM/Ms strain

  • Kimi Araki
  • Naoki Takeda
  • Atsushi Yoshiki
  • Yuichi Obata
  • Naomi Nakagata
  • Toshihiko Shiroishi
  • Kazuo Moriwaki
  • Ken-ichi Yamamura
Article

Abstract

MSM/Ms is an inbred mouse strain established from the Japanese wild mouse, Mus musculus molossinus, which has been phylogenetically distinct from common laboratory mouse strains for about 1 million years. The nucleotide substitution rate between MSM/Ms and C57BL/6 is estimated to be 0.96%. MSM/Ms mice display unique characteristics not observed in the commonly used laboratory strains, including an extremely low incidence of tumor development, high locomotor activity, and resistance to high-fat-diet-induced diabetes. Thus, functional genomic analyses using MSM/Ms should provide a powerful tool for the identification of novel phenotypes and gene functions. We report here the derivation of germline-competent embryonic stem (ES) cell lines from MSM/Ms blastocysts, allowing genetic manipulation of the M. m. molossinus genome. Fifteen blastocysts were cultured in ES cell medium and three ES lines, Mol/MSM-1, -2, and -3, were established. They were tested for germline competency by aggregation with ICR morulae and germline chimeras were obtained from all three lines. We also injected Mol/MSM-1 ES cells into blastocysts of ICR or C57BL/6 × BDF1 mice and found that blastocyst injection resulted in a higher production rate of chimeric mice than did aggregation. Furthermore, Mol/MSM-1 subclones electroporated with a gene trap vector were also highly efficient at producing germline chimeras using C57BL/6 × BDF1 blastocyst injection. This Mol/MSM-1 ES line should provide an excellent new tool allowing the genetic manipulation of the MSM/Ms genome.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kimi Araki
    • 1
  • Naoki Takeda
    • 2
  • Atsushi Yoshiki
    • 3
  • Yuichi Obata
    • 3
  • Naomi Nakagata
    • 2
  • Toshihiko Shiroishi
    • 4
  • Kazuo Moriwaki
    • 3
  • Ken-ichi Yamamura
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Developmental Genetics, Institute of Molecular Embryology and GeneticsKumamoto UniversityKumamotoJapan
  2. 2.Institute of Resource Development and AnalysisKumamoto UniversityKumamotoJapan
  3. 3.Riken Bioresource CenterTsukuba-shiJapan
  4. 4.National Institute of GeneticsMishimaJapan

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