Mammalian Genome

, Volume 16, Issue 8, pp 578–586

Genome screen for bone mineral density phenotypes in Fisher 344 and Lewis rat strains

  • Daniel L. Koller
  • Imranul Alam
  • Qiwei Sun
  • Lixiang Liu
  • Tonya Fishburn
  • Lucinda G. Carr
  • Michael J. Econs
  • Tatiana Foroud
  • Charles H. Turner
Article

Abstract

In humans, peak bone mineral density (BMD) is the primary determinant of osteoporotic fracture risk among older individuals, with high peak BMD levels providing protection against osteoporosis in the almost certain event of bone loss later in life. A genome screen to identify quantitative trait loci (QTLs) contributing to areal BMD (aBMD) and volumetric BMD (vBMD) measurements at the lumbar spine and femoral neck was completed in 595 female F2 rats produced from reciprocal crosses of inbred Fischer 344 and Lewis rats. Significant evidence of linkage was detected to rat Chromosomes 1, 2, 8, and 10, with LOD scores above 8.0. The region on rat Chromosome 8 is syntenic to human Chromosome 15, where linkage to spine and femur BMD has been previously reported and confirmed in a sample of premenopausal women.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Inc. 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Daniel L. Koller
    • 1
  • Imranul Alam
    • 2
  • Qiwei Sun
    • 2
  • Lixiang Liu
    • 1
  • Tonya Fishburn
    • 4
  • Lucinda G. Carr
    • 4
  • Michael J. Econs
    • 1
    • 4
  • Tatiana Foroud
    • 1
  • Charles H. Turner
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Medical and Molecular GeneticsIndiana University School of MedicineIndianapolisUSA
  2. 2.Department of Biomedical EngineeringIndiana University-Purdue University IndianapolisIndianapolisUSA
  3. 3.Department of Orthopaedic SurgeryIndiana University School of MedicineIndianapolisUSA
  4. 4.Department of Medicine, Division of EndocrinologyIndiana University School of MedicineIndianapolisUSA

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