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Mammalian Genome

, Volume 15, Issue 10, pp 768–783 | Cite as

Mouse functional genomics requires standardization of mouse handling and housing conditions

  • Marie–France Champy
  • Mohammed Selloum
  • Laetitia Piard
  • Valerie Zeitler
  • Claudia Caradec
  • Pierre Chambon
  • Johan Auwerx
Original Contributions

Abstract

The study of mouse models is crucial for the functional annotation of the human genome. The recent improvements in mouse genetics now moved the bottleneck in mouse functional genomics from the generation of mutant mice lines to the phenotypic analysis of these mice lines. Simple, validated, and reproducible phenotyping tests are a prerequisite to improving this phenotyping bottleneck. We analyzed here the impact of simple variations in animal handling and housing procedures, such as cage density, diet, gender, length of fasting, as well as site (retro-orbital vs. tail), timing, and anesthesia used during venipuncture, on biochemical, hematological, and metabolic/endocrine parameters in adult C57BL/6J mice. Our results, which show that minor changes in procedures can profoundly affect biological variables, underscore the importance of establishing uniform and validated animal procedures to improve reproducibility of mouse phenotypic data.

Keywords

Corticosterone Hematological Parameter Blood Parameter Amylase Level Free Fatty Acid Level 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgments

We thank animal facility technicians for expert technical assistance. This work was supported by grants of CNRS, INSERM, Hôpitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg, Reseau National en Genomique of the French Research Ministry, EU (Eumorphia program; QLRT-2001-00930), and NIH (1-P01-DK59820-01).

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Marie–France Champy
    • 1
  • Mohammed Selloum
    • 1
  • Laetitia Piard
    • 1
  • Valerie Zeitler
    • 1
  • Claudia Caradec
    • 1
  • Pierre Chambon
    • 1
  • Johan Auwerx
    • 1
  1. 1.Institut Clinique de la SourisIllkirch CedexFrance

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