European Radiology

, Volume 12, Issue 2, pp 357–365

Characterization of low-intensity lesions in the peripheral zone of prostate on pre-biopsy endorectal coil MR imaging

  • M. Cruz
  • K. Tsuda
  • Y. Narumi
  • Y. Kuroiwa
  • T. Nose
  • Y. Kojima
  • A. Okuyama
  • S. Takahashi
  • K. Aozasa
  • J. Barentsz
  • H. Nakamura
Urogenital

DOI: 10.1007/s003300101044

Cite this article as:
Cruz, M., Tsuda, K., Narumi, Y. et al. Eur Radiol (2002) 12: 357. doi:10.1007/s003300101044

Abstract.

The aim of this study was to determine which morphological features of low-intensity lesions in the peripheral zone of the prostate are predictable of prostate cancer on pre-biopsy T2-weighted integrated endorectal phased-array MR images. The MR examinations were performed in 69 consecutive patients with elevated level of prostate-specific antigen (>4 ng/ml) and/or a positive digital rectal examination before transperineal 12-site biopsy. Two radiologists evaluated presence of lesions, their morphological features, and possibility of malignancy in divided into four sections of the peripheral zone. Imaging analysis findings were compared with biopsy results. Discriminative features were selected by stepwise logistic regression. Descriptive statistics and receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curves were also calculated. Sixty-eight benign lesions and 23 malignant lesions were found. Wedge shape and diffuse extensions without mass effect were significantly associated with benignity (P=0.0105 and 0.002, respectively). Lesion size was significantly associated with malignancy (P=0.0001). For evaluating probability of malignancy for lesions, regression model showed a comparable accuracy with the total impression for the readers in ROC analysis (Az 0.9095 vs 0.9266, respectively). Wedge shape, diffuse extension without mass effect, and size are the morphological features of low-intensity lesions in the peripheral zone on pre-biopsy T2-weighted MR images that give the best prediction of malignancy.

Prostate cancer MR imaging Tissue characterization Neoplasms Diagnosis 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. Cruz
    • 1
  • K. Tsuda
    • 2
  • Y. Narumi
    • 1
  • Y. Kuroiwa
    • 3
  • T. Nose
    • 4
  • Y. Kojima
    • 5
  • A. Okuyama
    • 6
  • S. Takahashi
    • 1
  • K. Aozasa
    • 7
  • J. Barentsz
    • 8
  • H. Nakamura
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Radiology, Osaka University Medical School, 2–2 Yamadaoka, Suita-shi, Osaka 565–0871, JapanJapan
  2. 2.Department of Radiology, Sakai Municipal Hospital, 1–1–1 Minamiyasui-cho, Sakai-shi, Osaka 590–0064, JapanJapan
  3. 3.CRO Department, CRC Research Institute, Inc., 2–7–5 Minamisuna, Koutou-ku, Tokyo 136–8581, JapanJapan
  4. 4.Department of Radiation Therapy, Osaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Diseases, 1–3–3 Nakamichi, Higashinari-ku, Osaka 537–8511, JapanJapan
  5. 5.Department of Urology, Inoue Hospital, 16–17, Enochi, Suita-shi, Osaka 564–0053, JapanJapan
  6. 6.Department of Urology, Osaka University Medical School, 2–2 Yamadaoka, Suita-shi, Osaka 565–0871, JapanJapan
  7. 7.Department of Pathology, Osaka University Medical School, 2–2 Yamadaoka, Suita-shi, Osaka 565–0871, JapanJapan
  8. 8.Department of Radiology, Nijmegen University, Geert Grooteplein zuid 18, 6500 HB Nijmegen, The NetherlandsThe Netherlands

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