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European Radiology

, Volume 25, Issue 6, pp 1614–1622 | Cite as

Preoperative cardiac computed tomography for demonstration of congenital cardiac septal defect in adults

  • Hye-Joung Eom
  • Dong Hyun Yang
  • Joon-Won Kang
  • Dae-Hee Kim
  • Jong-Min Song
  • Duk-Hyun Kang
  • Jae-Kwan Song
  • Joon Bum Kim
  • Sung-Ho Jung
  • Suk Jung Choo
  • Cheol Hyun Chung
  • Jae Won Lee
  • Tae-Hwan Lim
Cardiac

Abstract

Objectives

We aimed to evaluate the role of preoperative cardiac computed tomography (CT) for adults with congenital cardiac septal defect (CSD).

Methods

Sixty-five consecutive patients who underwent preoperative CT and surgery for CSD were included. The diagnostic accuracy of CT and the concordance rate of the subtype classification of CSD were evaluated using surgical findings as the reference standard. Sixty-five patients without CSD who underwent cardiac valve surgery were used as a control group. An incremental value of CT over echocardiography was described retrospectively.

Results

Sensitivity and specificity of CT for diagnosis of CSD were 95 % and 100 %, respectively. The concordance rate of subtype classification was 91 % in CT and 92 % in echocardiography. The maximum size of the defect measured by CT correlated well with surgical measurement (r = 0.82), and the limit of agreement was -0.9 ± 7.42 mm. In comparison with echocardiography, CT was able to detect combined abnormalities in three cases, and exclusively provided correct subtype classification or clarified suspected abnormal findings found on echocardiography in seven cases.

Conclusions

Cardiac CT can accurately demonstrates CSD in preoperative adult patients. CT may have an incremental role in preoperative planning, particularly in those with more complex anatomy.

Key Points

Cardiac CT can demonstrate cardiac septal defect accurately in preoperative planning.

• Cardiac CT can demonstrate combined abnormalities of cardiac septal defect.

• Cardiac CT may have an incremental role over echocardiography in complex anatomy.

Keywords

Adult congenital heart disease Cardiac septal defect Computed tomography Imaging Sensitivity and specificity 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The scientific guarantor of this publication is Tae-Hwan Lim. The authors of this manuscript declare no relationships with any companies, whose products or services may be related to the subject matter of the article. This research was supported by Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF), funded by the Ministry of Science, ICT & Future Planning (NRF-2013R1A1A1058711) and a grant of the Korea Healthcare Technology R&D Project, Ministry of Health and Welfare, Republic of Korea (HI12C0630). No complex statistical methods were necessary for this paper. Institutional Review Board approval was obtained. Written informed consent was waived by the Institutional Review Board. Methodology: retrospective, diagnostic or prognostic study, performed at one institution.

Conflicts of interest

None.

Supplementary material

330_2014_3547_MOESM1_ESM.docx (14 kb)
ESM 1 (DOCX 14 kb)

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Copyright information

© European Society of Radiology 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hye-Joung Eom
    • 1
  • Dong Hyun Yang
    • 1
  • Joon-Won Kang
    • 1
  • Dae-Hee Kim
    • 2
  • Jong-Min Song
    • 2
  • Duk-Hyun Kang
    • 2
  • Jae-Kwan Song
    • 2
  • Joon Bum Kim
    • 3
  • Sung-Ho Jung
    • 3
  • Suk Jung Choo
    • 3
  • Cheol Hyun Chung
    • 3
  • Jae Won Lee
    • 3
  • Tae-Hwan Lim
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Cardiac Imaging Center, Asan Medical CenterUniversity of Ulsan College of MedicineSeoulSouth Korea
  2. 2.Department of Cardiology and Heart Institute, Cardiac Imaging Center, Asan Medical CenterUniversity of Ulsan College of MedicineSeoulSouth Korea
  3. 3.Department of Cardiothoracic surgery, Cardiac Imaging Center, Asan Medical CenterUniversity of Ulsan College of MedicineSeoulSouth Korea

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