European Radiology

, Volume 14, Issue 6, pp 1124–1129 | Cite as

Near-infrared fluorescence imaging of HER-2 protein over-expression in tumour cells

  • Ingrid Hilger
  • Yvonne Leistner
  • Alexander Berndt
  • Christine Fritsche
  • Karl Michael Haas
  • Hartwig Kosmehl
  • Werner A. Kaiser
Experimental

Abstract

The aim of this study was to evaluate in vitro and in vivo imaging of HER-2-over-expressing tumours using near-infrared optical imaging. A fluorochrome probe was designed by coupling Cy5.5 to anti-HER-2 antibodies. Cells over-expressing (SK-BR-3 cells) or normally expressing (PE/CA-PJ34 cells) the HER-2 protein were incubated with the probe. After removing unbound probe molecules, fluorescence intensities were determined (a.u.: arbitrary units). Cells were additionally investigated using FACS and laser scanning microscopy. The probe was also injected intravenously into tumours bearing SK-BR-3 (n=3) or PE/CA-PJ34 (n=3). Whole-body fluorescence images were generated and analysed. The incubation of SK-BR-3 cells with the probe led to higher fluorescence intensities [2,133 (±143) a.u.] compared to controls [975 (±95) a.u.]. The results from FACS and immunocytochemical analysis were in agreement with these findings. A distinct dependency between the fluorescence intensity and the cell number used in the incubations was detected. In vivo, the relative fluorescence intensities in SK-BR-3 tumours were higher than in PE/CA-PJ34 tumours at 16–24 h after probe application. HER-2-over-expressing tumours were depictable in their original size. Labelling of HER-2 with Cy5.5 is suitable for in vitro and in vivo detection of HER-2-over-expressing tumour cells.

Keywords

HER-2/neu Molecular imaging Optical imaging Near-infrared fluorescence imaging Breast cancer 

Notes

Acknowledgements

The authors thank Yvonne Heyne, Brigitte Maron and Christiane Geier for excellent technical assistance.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ingrid Hilger
    • 1
  • Yvonne Leistner
    • 1
  • Alexander Berndt
    • 2
  • Christine Fritsche
    • 1
  • Karl Michael Haas
    • 3
  • Hartwig Kosmehl
    • 4
  • Werner A. Kaiser
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute for Diagnostic and Interventional RadiologyFriedrich Schiller University Hospital JenaJenaGermany
  2. 2.Institute of PathologyJenaGermany
  3. 3.Clinic of Maxillofacial SurgeryFriedrich Schiller University Hospital JenaJenaGermany
  4. 4.Institute of PathologyHELIOS Klinikum Erfurt GmbHErfurtGermany

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