Polar Biology

, Volume 39, Issue 5, pp 829–849

Macroepibenthic communities at the tip of the Antarctic Peninsula, an ecological survey at different spatial scales

  • J. Gutt
  • M. C. Alvaro
  • A. Barco
  • A. Böhmer
  • A. Bracher
  • B. David
  • C. De Ridder
  • B. Dorschel
  • M. Eléaume
  • D. Janussen
  • D. Kersken
  • P. J. López-González
  • I. Martínez-Baraldés
  • M. Schröder
  • A. Segelken-Voigt
  • N. Teixidó
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s00300-015-1797-6

Cite this article as:
Gutt, J., Alvaro, M.C., Barco, A. et al. Polar Biol (2016) 39: 829. doi:10.1007/s00300-015-1797-6

Abstract

The Southern Ocean ecosystem at the Antarctic Peninsula has steep natural environmental gradients, e.g. in terms of water masses and ice cover, and experiences regional above global average climate change. An ecological macroepibenthic survey was conducted in three ecoregions in the north-western Weddell Sea, on the continental shelf of the Antarctic Peninsula in the Bransfield Strait and on the shelf of the South Shetland Islands in the Drake Passage, defined by their environmental envelop. The aim was to improve the so far poor knowledge of the structure of this component of the Southern Ocean ecosystem and its ecological driving forces. It can also provide a baseline to assess the impact of ongoing climate change to the benthic diversity, functioning and ecosystem services. Different intermediate-scaled topographic features such as canyon systems including the corresponding topographically defined habitats ‘bank’, ‘upper slope’, ‘slope’ and ‘canyon/deep’ were sampled. In addition, the physical and biological environmental factors such as sea-ice cover, chlorophyll-a concentration, small-scale bottom topography and water masses were analysed. Catches by Agassiz trawl showed high among-station variability in biomass of 96 higher systematic groups including ecological key taxa. Large-scale patterns separating the three ecoregions from each other could be correlated with the two environmental factors, sea-ice and depth. Attribution to habitats only poorly explained benthic composition, and small-scale bottom topography did not explain such patterns at all. The large-scale factors, sea-ice and depth, might have caused large-scale differences in pelagic benthic coupling, whilst small-scale variability, also affecting larger scales, seemed to be predominantly driven by unknown physical drivers or biological interactions.

Keywords

Southern Ocean Benthic habitats Ecoregions Bottom topography Canyon systems 

Funding information

Funder NameGrant NumberFunding Note
Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DE)
  • JA-1063/17-1
SCAR, AnT-ERA

    Copyright information

    © Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2015

    Authors and Affiliations

    • J. Gutt
      • 1
    • M. C. Alvaro
      • 2
    • A. Barco
      • 3
    • A. Böhmer
      • 1
    • A. Bracher
      • 1
      • 4
    • B. David
      • 5
      • 6
    • C. De Ridder
      • 7
    • B. Dorschel
      • 1
    • M. Eléaume
      • 8
    • D. Janussen
      • 9
    • D. Kersken
      • 9
    • P. J. López-González
      • 10
    • I. Martínez-Baraldés
      • 10
    • M. Schröder
      • 1
    • A. Segelken-Voigt
      • 1
      • 11
    • N. Teixidó
      • 12
      • 13
    1. 1.Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine ResearchBremerhavenGermany
    2. 2.Italian National Antarctic Museum (MNA), and Department of Earth, Environmental and Life Sciences (DISTAV)University of Genova (Italy)GenoaItaly
    3. 3.GEOMAR, Helmholtz Centre for Ocean ResearchKielGermany
    4. 4.Institute of Environmental PhysicsUniversity of BremenBremenGermany
    5. 5.Muséum national d’Histoire naturelleParisFrance
    6. 6.Biogéosciences, UMR CNRS 6282Université Bourgogne Franche-ComtéDijonFrance
    7. 7.Laboratoire de Biologie Marine (C.P. 160/15)Université Libre de BruxellesBrusselsBelgium
    8. 8.UMR 7205 CNRS MNHN UPMC EPHE, Muséum National d’Histoire Naturelle, Département Systématique et EvolutionISYEBParis Cedex 05France
    9. 9.Senckenberg Research Institute and Natural History MuseumFrankfurt Am MainGermany
    10. 10.Biodiversidad y Ecología de Invertebrados Marinos, Facultad de BiologíaUniversidad de SevillaSevilleSpain
    11. 11.Carl von Ossietzky University of OldenburgOldenburgGermany
    12. 12.Stazione Zoologica Anton DohrnNaplesItaly
    13. 13.Institut de Ciències del Mar (ICM-CSIC)BarcelonaSpain

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