Plant Cell Reports

, Volume 17, Issue 9, pp 675–680

Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation of Eucalyptus camaldulensis and production of transgenic plants

  • C.-K. Ho
  • S.-H. Chang
  • J.-Y. Tsay
  • C.-J. Tsai
  • V. L. Chiang
  • Z.-Z. Chen

DOI: 10.1007/s002990050464

Cite this article as:
Ho, CK., Chang, SH., Tsay, JY. et al. Plant Cell Reports (1998) 17: 675. doi:10.1007/s002990050464

Abstract

An efficient system for Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of Eucalyptus camaldulensis and production of transgenic plants was developed. Transformation was accomplished by cocultivation of hypocotyl segments with Agrobacterium tumefaciens containing a binary Ti-plasmid vector harboring chimeric neomycin phosphotransferase and β-glucuronidase (GUS) genes. A modified Gamborg's B5 medium used in this study was effective for both callus induction and regeneration of transgenic shoots. This medium could also effectively maintain the organogenic capability of callus for more than a year. Culturing transgenic shoots in Murashige and Skoog medium supplemented with 0.1 mg ⋅ l–1 benzylaminopurine prior to root induction in rooting medium markedly increased the rootability of shoots that were recalcitrant to rooting. Histochemical assay revealed the expression of the GUS gene in leaf, stem, and root tissues of transgenic plants. Insertion of the GUS gene in the nuclear genome of transgenic plants was verified by genomic Southern hybridization analysis, further confirming the integration and expression of T-DNA in these plants.

Key words Genetic transformation Agrobacterium Eucalyptus Regeneration 

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • C.-K. Ho
    • 1
  • S.-H. Chang
    • 1
  • J.-Y. Tsay
    • 1
  • C.-J. Tsai
    • 2
  • V. L. Chiang
    • 2
  • Z.-Z. Chen
    • 1
  1. 1.Division of Silviculture, Taiwan Forestry Research Institute, 53 Nan-Hai Road, Taipei 100, Taiwan Fax no: 886-2-23895531 E-mail: zzchen@serv.tfri.gov.twTW
  2. 2.Plant Biotechnology Research Center, School of Forestry and Wood Products, Michigan Technological University, Houghton, MI 49931, USAUS

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