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FLOURY ENDOSPERM15 encodes a glyoxalase I involved in compound granule formation and starch synthesis in rice endosperm

  • Xiaoman You
  • Wenwei Zhang
  • Jinlong Hu
  • Ruonan Jing
  • Yue Cai
  • Zhiming Feng
  • Fei Kong
  • Jie Zhang
  • Haigang Yan
  • Weiwei Chen
  • Xingang Chen
  • Jing Ma
  • Xiaojie Tang
  • Peng Wang
  • Shanshan Zhu
  • Linglong Liu
  • Ling Jiang
  • Jianmin WanEmail author
Original Article

Abstract

Key message

FLO15encodes a plastidic glyoxalase I protein, OsGLYI7, which affects compound starch granule formation and starch synthesis in rice endosperm.

Abstract

Starch synthesis in rice (Oryza sativa) endosperm is a sophisticated process, and its underlying molecular machinery still remains to be elucidated. Here, we identified and characterized two allelic rice floury endosperm 15 (flo15) mutants, both with a white-core endosperm. The flo15 grains were characterized by defects in compound starch granule development, along with decreased starch content. Map-based cloning of the flo15 mutants identified mutations in OsGLYI7, which encodes a glyoxalase I (GLYI) involved in methylglyoxal (MG) detoxification. The mutations of FLO15/OsGLYI7 resulted in increased MG content in flo15 developing endosperms. FLO15/OsGLYI7 localizes to the plastids, and the in vitro GLYI activity derived from flo15 was significantly decreased relative to the wild type. Moreover, the expression of starch synthesis-related genes was obviously altered in the flo15 mutants. These findings suggest that FLO15 plays an important role in compound starch granule formation and starch synthesis in rice endosperm.

Keywords

Rice·endosperm FLOURY ENDOSPERM 15 Glyoxalase I Starch synthesis·compound granule 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This research was supported by the Key Laboratory of Biology, Genetics and Breeding of Japonica Rice in Mid-lower Yangtze River, Ministry of Agriculture, P. R. China, and Jiangsu Collaborative Innovation Center for Modern Crop Production, and grants from The National Key Research and Development Program of China (2017YFD0100404), Jiangsu Science and Technology Development Program (BE2015355-1, BE2017368), and Agricultural Science and Technology Innovation Fund project of Jiangsu Province (CX(16)1029).

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

All authors approved the final manuscript and declared no conflict of interest.

Supplementary material

299_2019_2370_MOESM1_ESM.docx (9.5 mb)
Supplementary material 1 (DOCX 9765 KB)

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Xiaoman You
    • 1
  • Wenwei Zhang
    • 1
  • Jinlong Hu
    • 1
  • Ruonan Jing
    • 1
  • Yue Cai
    • 1
  • Zhiming Feng
    • 1
  • Fei Kong
    • 1
  • Jie Zhang
    • 1
  • Haigang Yan
    • 1
  • Weiwei Chen
    • 2
  • Xingang Chen
    • 1
  • Jing Ma
    • 1
  • Xiaojie Tang
    • 1
  • Peng Wang
    • 1
  • Shanshan Zhu
    • 2
  • Linglong Liu
    • 1
  • Ling Jiang
    • 1
  • Jianmin Wan
    • 1
    • 2
    Email author
  1. 1.State Key Laboratory for Crop Genetics and Germplasm Enhancement, Jiangsu Plant Gene Engineering Research CenterNanjing Agricultural UniversityNanjingChina
  2. 2.National Key Facility for Crop Gene Resources and Genetic Improvement, Institute of Crop ScienceChinese Academy of Agriculture SciencesBeijingChina

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