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Plant Cell Reports

, Volume 32, Issue 7, pp 1067–1074 | Cite as

Crosstalk between GA and JA signaling mediates plant growth and defense

  • Xingliang Hou
  • Lihua Ding
  • Hao Yu
Review

Abstract

Gibberellins (GAs) and jasmonates (JAs) are two types of essential phytohormones that control many aspects of plant growth and development in response to environmental and endogenous signals. GA regulates many essential plant developmental processes, while JA plays a dominant role in mediating plant response to stress. Recent studies have revealed that intensive crosstalk between GA and JA signaling is involved in both plant development and defense to biotic or abiotic stress. In particular, interaction between DELLAs and JA ZIM-domain (JAZ) proteins, which are key repressors in GA- and JA-signaling pathways, respectively, plays a key role in mediating the balance between plant growth and defense through modulating the activity of their interacting transcriptional factors in response to GA and JA signals. Here, we briefly review the recent progress in understanding the antagonistic and synergistic crosstalk between GA and JA signaling with a focus on the central role of DELLA–JAZ interaction in addressing the plant dilemma between “to grow” and “to defend” in response to various stimuli.

Keywords

GA JA Plant growth Plant defense Phytohormone signaling 

Notes

Acknowledgments

We thank Lisha Shen for proofreading of the manuscript. This work was supported by Academic Research Fund R-154-000-506-112 from National University of Singapore, the Singapore National Research Foundation under its Competitive Research Programme (NRF2010NRF-CRP002-018), and the intramural research fund from Temasek Life Sciences Laboratory. We apologize to those authors whose excellent work could not be cited due to space limitations.

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© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.South China Botanical Garden, The Chinese Academy of SciencesGuangzhouChina
  2. 2.Department of Biological Sciences and Temasek Life Sciences LaboratoryNational University of SingaporeSingaporeSingapore

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