Plant Cell Reports

, Volume 32, Issue 3, pp 349–357 | Cite as

Evaluation of antioxidant activity of leafy vegetables and beans with myoglobin method

  • Masaaki Terashima
  • Akiko Fukukita
  • Riho Kodama
  • Haruka Miki
  • Mayuko Suzuki
  • Maya Ikegami
  • Noriko Tamura
  • Akari Yasuda
  • Mami Morikawa
  • Saki Matsumura
Original Paper

Abstract

Key message

Antioxidant activity of seven leafy vegetables and four beans against five reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species was clearly characterized with a protocol using myoglobin as a reporter probe.

Abstract

Antioxidant activity of seven leafy vegetables and four beans against peroxyl radical, hydroxyl radical, hypochlorite ion, and peroxynitrite ion has been measured using myoglobin as a reporter probe (myoglobin method). Conventional DPPH method was also used to evaluate antioxidant activity of the samples. Difference of activity against different reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) was characterized by plotting the data in a 5-axe cobweb chart. This plot clearly showed the characteristics of the antioxidant activity of the leafy vegetables and the beans. The samples examined in this work were categorized into four groups. (1) The samples showed high antioxidant activity against all ROS and RNS: daikon sprout, spinach, Qing-geng-cai, and onion. (2) The samples showed high antioxidant activity against peroxyl radical: red bean and soy bean. (3) The samples showed high antioxidant against hypochlorite ion: broccoli floret, cabbage, and Chinese cabbage. (4) The samples showed weak antioxidant activity against all ROS and RNS: cowpea and common beans. Our protocol is probably useful to characterize antioxidant activity of the crops of different cultivars, the crops obtained in different growing environments and growing seasons, the crops harvested at different age, and the crops stored in the different conditions, as well as the changes of activity during cooking process of the crops.

Keywords

Antioxidant Leafy vegetable Bean Reactive oxygen species Oxygen radical absorbance capacity 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Masaaki Terashima
    • 1
  • Akiko Fukukita
    • 1
  • Riho Kodama
    • 1
  • Haruka Miki
    • 1
  • Mayuko Suzuki
    • 1
  • Maya Ikegami
    • 1
  • Noriko Tamura
    • 1
  • Akari Yasuda
    • 1
  • Mami Morikawa
    • 1
  • Saki Matsumura
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Biosphere Sciences, School of Human SciencesKobe CollegeNishinomiya CityJapan

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