Plant Cell Reports

, Volume 26, Issue 8, pp 1309–1320

Genes expression analyses of sea-island cotton (Gossypium barbadense L.) during fiber development

  • Li-Li Tu
  • Xian-Long Zhang
  • Shao-Guang Liang
  • Di-Qiu Liu
  • Long-Fu Zhu
  • Fan-Chang Zeng
  • Yi-Chun Nie
  • Xiao-Ping Guo
  • Feng-Lin Deng
  • Jia-Fu Tan
  • Li Xu
Genetics and Genomics

Abstract

Sea-island cotton (Gossypium barbadense L.) is one of the most valuable cotton species due to its silkiness, luster, long staples, and high strength, but its fiber development mechanism has not been surveyed comprehensively. We constructed a normalized fiber cDNA library (from −2 to 25 dpa) of G. barbadense cv. Pima 3-79 (the genetic standard line) by saturation hybridization with genomic DNA. We screened Pima 3-79 fiber RNA from five developmental stages using a cDNA array including 9,126 plasmids randomly selected from the library, and we selected and sequenced 929 clones that had different signal intensities between any two stages. The 887 high-quality expressed sequence tags obtained were assembled into 645 consensus sequences (582 singletons and 63 contigs), of which 455 were assigned to functional categories using gene ontology. Almost 50% of binned genes belonged to metabolism functional categories. Based on subarray analysis of the 887 high-quality expressed sequence tags with 0-, 5-, 10-, 15-, and 20-dpa RNA of Pima 3-79 fibers and a mixture of RNA of nonfiber tissues, seven types of expression profiles were elucidated. Furthermore our results showed that phytohormones may play an important role in the fiber development.

Keywords

cDNA array ESTs Fiber development Normalized cDNA library Sea-island cotton 

Supplementary material

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Li-Li Tu
    • 1
  • Xian-Long Zhang
    • 1
  • Shao-Guang Liang
    • 1
  • Di-Qiu Liu
    • 1
  • Long-Fu Zhu
    • 1
  • Fan-Chang Zeng
    • 1
  • Yi-Chun Nie
    • 1
  • Xiao-Ping Guo
    • 1
  • Feng-Lin Deng
    • 1
  • Jia-Fu Tan
    • 1
  • Li Xu
    • 1
  1. 1.National Key Laboratory of Crop Genetic ImprovementHuazhong Agricultural UniversityWuhanChina

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